Fred Godfrey’s Irish Songs

 

 

My Father Was Born In Killarney

 

Fred Godfrey liked to claim that, since his mother was Irish, he could write songs of old Erin straight from the heart. In fact, Fred had no known Irish roots (his father was Welsh, his mother English), and his “Irish” songs, like any of his others, were knocked off to feed the insatiable public demand for such material. Several became big hits (see the links below). Most celebrate Irish-ness in a comic or nostalgic way, some appeal to ethnic pride, but the subtitle of one, My Father Was Born In Killarney (Don’t Run Down The Irish) (1911), acknowledges the existence of less benign attitudes.

 

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Arrah! Go On, Now, Miss Emerald Isle
A.J. Mills & Fred Godfrey; British Library credits Godfrey alone — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1915.
Recordings: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1508, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo 1295, 1915); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2862,1915)

Back To Tipperary
Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & H. Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915?
Recording:  Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1494, 1915)

Be Sure He’s Irish
Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs, 1914.
Recording: Ella Retford (Jumbo 1232, 1914)

Bridget Malone (Queen Of The Opera)
Fred Godfrey & John A. Glover-Kind — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.

Come And Do The Kelly Two-Step
Fred Godfrey, 1920 [British Library entry]; Star Music sheet has Maurice Scott & Frank Wood.

Come Back To Ireland And Me
music by Ronald F. Wakley, words by Fred Godfrey — London: West & Co., 1916.

 

Come Back To Ireland And Me
From the archives of British Pathé,
see newsreel footage from
27 October 1930
of Talbot O’Farrell singing
Come Back To Ireland And Me:

http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=8391.

 

Danny O’Doherty’s Dance
Fred Godfrey; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

The Heart Of Molly Malone
H. Worton David, Lawrence Wright & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915?

Hello There Flanagan
Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1919.
Recording:  Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1932, 1919)

I’m Coming Back To Old Kilkenny
Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

I’m Off To Kelly’s Isle
Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

In My Home At Bantry Bay
Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

In That Little Irish Town
Fred Godfrey — London: Montgomery, 1927.

It Takes An Irish Heart To Sing An Irish Song
Fred Godfrey & H. Worton David — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

It Takes More Than That To Steal An Irish Heart Away
Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.
Recording:  Arthur Cox (Zonophone 2844, 1926)

John James Brannigan
Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.
Recording:  Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin, 1911)

A Little Bit Of Ireland
Fred Godfrey, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

Maggie Ryan
Fred Godfrey & J. Lloyd as “James Walsh”, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

Molly OMorgan (The Irish-Italian Girl)
Fred Godfrey & Will Letters — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1909.

The Mother Old Ireland Gave Me
Fred Godfrey — London: Ideal Music, 1946.

My Father Was Born In Killarney (Don’t Run Down The Irish)
Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — Sydney: Dinsdale, [1911].

Paddy McCarty’s Party
Fred Godfrey, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

Sally OMalley
Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1910.

Sheila O’Neil
Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912.
Recording:  Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin, 1913)

Sing Me An Irish Song
Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey.

Sing Something Irish To Me
Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1911.

That’s How Ireland Was Born
Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1946.

There’s A Little Bit Of Irish Everywhere
Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.
Recording:  Charlie Collins (Zonophone Twin 1739, 1916)

There’s Something In The Irish After All
Leslie Leonard Cooke, Shaun Glenville & Fred Godfrey, date unknown; title from EMI database.

Underneath An Irish Moon
Fred Godfrey, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

Were Irish And Proud Of It, Too
Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

When An Irishman Goes Fighting
music by Fred Godfrey, words by Leslie Leonard Cooke; EMI also credits Shaun Glenville — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.
Recording: Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo A348, 1915?)

When They Ask You What Your Name Is (Tell ’Em It’s Molloy)
Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Allan’s, 1908.

Where Did You Get The Name Of Hennessy?
Fred Godfrey & Terry Sullivan, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.
Recording:  Shaun Glenville (Regal G-7607, 1915)

The Yiddisher Irish Baby (Levi, Carney, Jacob, Barney, Michael Isaacstein)
Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & H. Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1914; Bert Feldman, 1915.
Recordings: Shaun Glenville (Regal G-7221, 1915); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2825)

Your Father And Mother Are Irish
Will Letters & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.