All the Known Fred Godfrey Songs

 

Fred Godfrey’s Greatest Hits (includes sound clips)

 

Irish Songs

 

Scottish Songs

 

Services (War) Songs

 

Songs of Uncertain Authorship

Fred Godfrey claimed to have written a number of Music Hall successes for which he never received credit in the published sheet music.

 

 

More than 800 Fred Godfrey songs are known;
here are the sheet music covers and record labels of a small selection
(the complete list of known Godfrey songs continues below).

 

Any More For The Boat Train
Anywhere Will Do (US)
Arm In Arm Together
The Bells Of Tobermory
Calling Me Home
Charles (Cha-Cha-Cha Charles)
Chimney-Pots Of My Home Town
The Christening Of The Baby Doll
Dad And Mammy's Golden Wedding Jubilee
The Day He Took Me To Wembley
A Dream Of Asia
Give Me Your Love For Keeps
Going Home
Hello There Flanagan
He's A Very Old Friend Of Mine
     
Image source:
National Library of Australia,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.mus-an10029894
I-A-Like-A-You
I Called You Sweetheart
Idaho
I'll Saw His See-Saw Down (Australian) I'm Going Tomorrow, Today
I'm Gonna Be Married Sunday
Image source:
National Library of Australia,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.mus-vn5056316-s1-v
It's No Use
Jack, Jack, Jack, Come Along Back, Back, Back
The Last Man
Let's Sing The Cuddley Song
A Little Dutch Heaven
Little Green Heaven
Mary
Mary's A Beautiful Name
My Tennessee, Is That You Calling Me
Oh, Gee
Oh How You Love
Oh Mary
Oh! You Paree
Pierrot Parade
The Poor Girl Cried
Poor Old Father
Put On Your Old Plaid Shawl (Australian) Poor Old Father Razzy Wazzy Lou
Image source:
National Library of Australia,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.mus-an9979136
Rolling Home In The Morning (Australian)
Rolling Home In The Morning
The Rose Of Alabam
Roses Red And Roses White
Image source:
National Library of Australia,
http://nla.gov.au/nla.mus-an12857359
   
She Said She Wouldn't — But She Did! Sing Something Irish To Me Sorry Stop It, John! (Australian)
Written by Fred Godfrey
under the pseudonym
“Edward E. Elton”
     
A Stranger In My Own Home Town
Tennessee Twilight
That's How Ireland Was Born
There Is Always A Silver Lining
There's A Girl In Berlin
They All Did The Goose-Step Home
Till You Come Back Again
Ting! Ting! Tra-La-La
Tonight, By The Firelight Glow
The Tripper's Lullaby
Try A Smile
The Ukulele Wedding
   
Written by Fred Godfrey
under the pseudonym
“Dan Grahame”
Watching The Boat Coming In
The Wedding Of Wee MacGregor
We've All Got To Walk Back Home
What Did You Want To Make Me Love You For
When We're Made One, We Two
Where The Mountain Meets The Sky
Wonder Where You've Been
Would I Like
Your Wonderful Eyes
You’ve Got To Show Me
 

 

 

Labels of some of the hundreds of recordings of Fred Godfrey songs

 

Are We All Here
Dance Your Troubles Away
Doh, Ray, Me, Fah, Soh, Lah, Te, Doh
Don’t Let Me Get Any Better, Nurse
Don’t Sing A Song About A Rose To Me
Down In Virginia
Fed Up And Far From Home
The Feller That Played The Pianner
I’m Taking That Baby Home
I’m The Only Bit Of Comfort That She’s Got
It’s A Far Better Thing I Do Than I Have Ever Done
In The Island Of Go-As-You-Please
John Bull’s Daughters
The Last Train Home Tonight
Mississippi
Mulligatawny
My Tennessee, Is That You Calling Me
My Young Man Is Not A Chocolate Soldier
Oh, Chanticler
Oh For The Sight Of A Girl
Oh! Mary, Look What You’ve Done For Me
Oh, The Sailors Of The King
Oh! You Have No Idea
Sheila O’Neil
Some Little Girl Named Mary
Squeeze Her, Ebenezer
Twas An Old-Fashioned Song He Was Singing
Wonder Where You’ve Been
 

 

 

Below is a list of all known Fred Godfrey songs. Please click on titles with links for
sheet music covers, record labels, and other information.

 

A.B.C.D.E.F.G.

Fred Godfrey — London; New York: M. Whitmark & Sons, 1911; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1938 [Library of Congress].


The Adventurer

Fred Godfrey, [ca. 1913] (same Godfrey?).

Recording: Robert Howe (Marathon 246, 1913; vertical cut disc)

 

Ah! Ah! Ah! There You Are Again

David, Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1505, 1915)

 

All Day Long I’m Thinking Of You, Just You

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

All Girls Are Beautiful

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 17 July 1913; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

 

All Scotch

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.

Recording: Sandy Rowan (Zonophone 6086, 1932)

 

All The Houses Were Going Round And Round

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911.


All The Ladies Fell In Love With Sandy

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913.

 

All The Men Are Wonderful

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.
Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?].

 

All The Silver From The Silvery Moon

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.


All Through The Scent That Silly Sent To Millicent

Fred Godfrey & Ralph Butler — London: Cameo Music, [late 1920s?].

 

All Together

Harry Carlton & Fred Godfrey — 1910.

Introduced by male impersonator Hetty King.           

    

Americana

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

And The Cigarette Went Out

Fred Godfrey & Fred D’Albert — 1909.

Possibly sung by Miss Maybelle Morgan, “Australia’s gem chorus singer, youth, voice,. charm, and ability,” Shepherd’s Bush Empire and London Pavilion (April 1909) (The Era, 3 April 1909, p. 40; 10 April 1909, p. 40).

Angeline Put On Your Crinoline

Terry Sullivan, Harry Carlton & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Annie The Farmer’s Daughter

Fred Godfrey, 1937; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society; usually credited to Max Miller. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller (HMV BD-482, 1937), reissued on LP “The Golden Age of Max Miller” (Music for Pleasure GX-2503, 1980), with credit to Miller alone.

 

Any More For The Boat Train?

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1915.
Interpolated in the all-soldier revue The Babes in the Wood (No. 1 Convalescent Camp, France, 25 December 1915). Sung by Victoria Carmen in pantomime Dick Whittington, Newcastle Empire (December 1915), Edinburgh Empire (January 1916), Sheffield Empire (February 1916); by Flo Carlton, “the dainty little Australian girl,” Bath Palace (June 1916); by Nora Delany, Boscombe (Dorset) Hippodrome (June 1915); by Maud Esmond in Harry Burns’s pantomime Forty Thieves, Walthamstow Palace, and Her Majesty’s, Walsall (January 1916); by Dorothy Firmin in “The Allies Concert Party,” Red Cross hospital, Avoncliff (Wilts.) (September 1917); by Kathleen Grey in pantomime Red Riding Hood, Plymouth Royal (January 1916); by Graham Keith in Jack Williams’ revue When Irish Eyes Are Smiling, Theatre Royal, Jarrow (August 1915); by Evelyn Major, Willesden Hippodrome (June 1916); by Effie Ray in Jack Williams’s revue When Irish Eyes Are Smiling (1915); by Maudie Vera in Harry Burns’s pantomime Robinson Crusoe, Derby Hippodrome (December 1915) — “Maudie Vera is a vivacious Polly Perkins, her light-hearted gaiety being infectious, and she puts plenty of ‘go’ into ‘Any more for the boat train?’” (The Stage, 30 December 1915, p. 9); by Olive Weir, Chelsea Palace (May 1916) — “Miss Weir hands out the goods in a most attractive manner” (The Era, 10 May 1916, p. 7). And “Reg Wentworth, who is touring in Wales, has a most successful number in ‘Any more for the boat train?’ by Mills, Scott, and Fred Godfrey” (The Era, 3 May 1916, p. 20).

Recordings: Hayes & Croft (Coliseum 880, 1915); Clara Beck (HMV B-619, 1915); The Two Filberts (Jumbo 36066, 1915?)

 

Any Windows To Mend?

Fred Godfrey & George D’Albert — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907; a December 1906 report in The Era credits Fred D’Albert, instead of George.

Introduced by Amber Austa.

 

Anything To Take Me Home

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

Sung by Elsie Malpas, King’s Theatre, Dundee (August 1913); “Elsie Malpas is a young society entertainer who is quickly carving out her niche in the temple of music-hall fame. She is a dainty little lass and very accomplished. Miss Malpas knows how to make the most of a song, and ‘Anything to take me home’ [is] given in capital style” (Dundee Courier, 26 August 1913, p. 6).

Recordings: Albert Whelan (Jumbo 1091, 1913); Jack Charman as “Ted Yorke” (Edison Bell Velvet Face 1390, 1914)

 

Anywhere On Louisiana Bay

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Interpolated in the Francis Laidler production The Silver Lining (1915). Sung by Beatrice Allen in John Tiller revue The Swiss Miss, Elephant and Castle, London (1915); by Miss Teddy Butt in Campbell and Mostel’s revue What A Beauty (1915); by Sophie Forrest, Newcastle Hippodrome (May 1915) — “At the Hippodrome, Newcastle-on-Tyne, last week Sophie Forrest made a hit with ‘Anywhere On Louisiana Bay’, a new rag song, by Fred Godfrey, Worton David , and Lawrence Wright. The publishers, the Lawrence Wright Music Co., anticipate a demand for this number” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 6 May 1915, p. 11); by Ethel Ra Leslie, Camberwell [London] Empire (August 1915).,” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 5 August 1915, p. 16).

 

Anywhere Will Do

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1908; New York: Nove Music, 1909.
Interpolated by Kathleen Franklin & Herbert Cyril in Joseph Hart’s musical review Snap-Shots (New York [Broadway]; Garrick Theatre, Wilmington, Delaware [December 1909]; Orpheum Theatre, Brooklyn, New York [February 1910]).

From a review in a Wilmington, Delaware, newspaper, 1909:

Joseph Hart’s newest girl revue, set to music, entitled “Snap-Shots,” opens tomorrow after its successful premier on Broadway. “Snap-Shots” is a typical metropolitan vaudeville production and in it are featured Herbert Cyril and Kathleen Franklin. it is in some respects the most elaborate and ingenious of the many successes that have borne the Joseph Hart trade mark of excellence and genuineness. This act, conceived and personally constructed by Mr. Hart, is in four complete scenes….The fourth song is another one of those startling realistic and bewilderingly beautiful Joseph Hart effects that have made his name something to conjure with in the line of modern stagecraft. “Anywhere With You” [sic] is the song presented during this scene, and the scene shows the entire company out on the water in canoes and paddling seemingly toward the audience. (“Great Acts at Garrick: ‘Joe’ Hart’s Ingenious New Production ‘Snap-Shots’ Coming,” Star (Wilmington, Delaware), 5 December 1909, p. 15)

Recording: Harry Fay (Columbia D-216, 1908; Columbia-Rena 1069, 1909)

 

Are We All Here?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1912.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 1012, reissued on Ariel Grand and HMV-Victor [Canada])

 

Are Ye A’ Richt The Noo?

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1534, 1915)

 

Are You Happy? Yes We Are

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Arm In Arm Together

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Bert Feldman, 1931.
Sung by Dorothy Ward.


Arrah! Go On, Now, Miss Emerald Isle

words by A.J. Mills, music by Fred Godfrey [Library of Congress]; British Library credits Godfrey alone — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1915.

Sung by Sybil Arundle, Oxford Theatre, London (June 1915) — “At the Oxford last week Sybil Arundle was singing ‘Arrah Go On, Miss Emerald Isle’, which proved most successful. She was assisted by six little girls dressed in typical Irish costume” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 3 June 1915, p. 16); by Helen Charles, Glasgow Coliseum (September 1915); by Daisy Dormer, Nelson [Lancs.] Palace (April 1915) and Finsbury Park [London] Empire (July 1915); by Annie Hana, Shoreditch [London] Empire (June 1915).

Recordings: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1508, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo 1295, 1915); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2862,1915)

 

At The Bathing Parade

Max Miller & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1938.

Interpolated by Max Miller in the film Everything Happens To Me (1938)

Recording: Max Miller (HMV BD-697, 1938), reissued on LP “The Golden Age of Max Miller” (Music for Pleasure GX-2503, 1980), reissued on 2-cassette set “The Cheeky Chappie” (EMI ECC-10, 1990), reissued on CD “Max Miller, Volume 2: The Pure Gold Of The Music Hall” (Pearl PAST CD 9736, 1991)..

 

Au Revoir, Sweet Marie!

words by Leslie Leonard Cooke, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.


Auntie Nellie’s Sunday At Home

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

The Baby’s Parade

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Alf J. Lawrance — London: Star Music, 1908.

 

Back, Back To Baby Days

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1916.

 

Back To Tipperary

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915

Sung by Florence Eden in pantomime Little Red Riding Hood and Bold Robin Hood, Victoria Opera House, Burnley (January 1916); by Florrie Forde, Leeds Hippodrome (April 1915) — “Florrie Forde’s summer songs, [including] ‘Back, Back To Tipperary,’ are now well-matured successes in the towns this lady has recently visited. At Leeds, where Miss Forde is appearing this week at the Hippodrome, the choruses are being sung and whistled” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 29 April 1915, p. 21); by Ethel Ra Leslie, Empire, Camberwell [London] (August 1915).

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1494, 1915)

 

The Band Was Playing An Old Scotch Tune

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1915.

Recordings: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1534, 1915); Black Diamonds Band, in “Camp Concert” (Zonophone Twin 1572, 1915)

 

Be Sure He’s Irish

Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs, 1914.

Recording: Ella Retford (Jumbo 1232, 1914)

 

Because I Love You That’s All

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, 1909.


Because Of You

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1927; title from EMI database.

 

The Belle Of Cotton Town

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

The Bells Of Tobermory

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1918.
Interpolated in pantomime Babes In The Wood, His Majesty’s Theatre, Aberdeen (December 1918); sung by Hazel Galde in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Her Majesty’s Theatre, Dundee (January 1919).


Birdie Birdie Playing Her Hurdy Gurdy

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Blame It Onto Poor Old Father

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913.

 

Bless ’Em All

James Lally, as “Jimmy Hughes”, Frank Kerslake, as “Frank Lake” & Fred Godfrey [British Library, Performing Right Society (PRS), American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN)]; originally written by Fred Godfrey in 1917; EMI lists as Hughes, Godfrey, Al Stillman & Lake; PRS credits Terry Sullivan with additional lyrics; published UK sheet music credits Hughes & Lake only; new US lyrics by Al Stillman, 1941 — London: Keith Prowse Music, 1940; Sydney: W.H. Paling, 1940; Toronto: Gordon V. Thompson, 1941; New York?: Sam Fox Publishing, 1941.

 

Blue Eyes, words by Fred Godfrey, as “Godfrey Williams”, music by Lawrence Wright, as “Horatio Nicholls” — London: Lawrence Wright Music; Bert Feldman, 1915; copyright renewed by Godfrey & Wright, 1943 [Library of Congress].

 

Boo-Hooray

Fred Godfrey & James Lally [as “Jimmy Hughes”?] — London: Campbell, Connelly, 1941.


Bridget Malone (Queen Of The Opera)

Fred Godfrey & John A. Glover-Kind — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.


Broncho Bill

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [date unknown]; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.


Buff, Buff, Buffalo

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey; EMI data base credits Godfrey, Daisy Dormer & Castling — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

Introduced by Daisy Dormer.

 

Call Again, Mr. Opportunity

Fred Godfrey & Terry Sullivan — London: Charles Sheard, 1910.
Sung by Cassie Walmer, Shoreditch [London] Olympia (June 1909) — “Miss Cassie Walmer, the favourite dusky comedy artist, score in the song ‘Call again, Mr Opportunity,’ and her dance meets with decided approval” (The Era, 12 June 1909, p. 16).

 

Call Me Early In The Morning

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912.


Call Round On Sunday

Fred Godfrey, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911.

 

Calling Me Home

Fred Godfrey & T. Turner-Spencer — London: Bert Feldman, 1922.
Sung by Shaun Glenville.


“Canadian” number (Fred Godfrey & Fred D’Albert — London: Shapiro Von Tilzer Publishing, 1907; mentioned in “The Music-Hall World,” London and Provincial Entr’acte, 13 December 1906, p. 7).

 

Can’t You Spare One Little Feather? (Mister Ostrich)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

Certainly Not Mr. Parkington Pott

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey, [mid-1920s?].


Charles (Cha-Cha-Cha-Charles)

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1922.
Sung by Beth Tate in Midnight Follies, Hotel Metropole, London (August 1922).

“Those in the know are beginning to ‘say things’ about this new comedy song....Blackpool has taken to it instantaneously. Douglas [Isle of Man] ditto. From the latter resort a breezy note from that clever comedienne, Elsie Steadman, who says: ‘Yes! I think ‘Charles’ great and will put it on this week.’....Meantime, Violet Trevenyan is scoring with the song at the Holborn Empire. Good news may travel slow, but good songs seem to get round pretty quickly” (“Footlight Flashes,” The Era, 30 August 1922, p. 20).

 

The Chimney-Pots Of My Home Town

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1944.

 

Chop Stick Sue

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Barclay — 1926.

Written for Vesta Victoria‘s return to the Variety stage; sung by her at the Victoria Palace, London (March 1926).

 

The Christening Of The Baby Doll

George Arthurs & Fred Godfrey — London: Keith Prowse Music, 1930.

Interpolated in pantomime Sleeping Beauty, Royal Theatre, Birmingham (December 1930). Sung by Clarkson Rose (The Stage, 15 May 1930, p. 8).

 

Cleo My Cleopatra

George Arthurs & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


Cleopatra Got The Needle; possibly When Cleopatra Got The Needle

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [1931?].
Possibly sung by Bert Errol, Poplar Theatre, London (November 1931) — “Bert Errol, the female impersonator, is in great form as a ‘Was’ and ‘When Cleopatra got the needle’ [same song?] (The Era, 4 November 1931, p. 14).


The Closer They Nestle Together

Fred Godfrey — London?: Southern Music, 1934.


The Colliers (A Lot Of Little Blackbirds In A Cage)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey; EMI database also credits Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.


Colonel K-Nut

Fred Godfrey & Mark Sheridan — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1915; title first mentioned as “Colonel Nutt” in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 27 September 1912.

Recordings: Mark Sheridan (Jumbo 958, 1913; Marathon 407, 1913 [vertical cut disc]; The Winner 2487, 1913; Pathé 8878, 1913; Diamond 077, 1913)

 

Come Along To The Carnival Tonight

words by Harry Gifford, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.


Come And Do The Kelly Two-Step

Fred Godfrey, 1920 [British Library entry]; Star Music sheet has Maurice Scott & Frank Wood.


Come And Have A Drink At The Victory Arms

Tolchard Evans, Ralph Butler & Fred Godfrey; British Library credits Evans only — London: Keith Prowse Music, 1941.


Come And Have A Look At What I’ve Got!

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams [1911]; EMI database credits Godfrey alone — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.

 

Come Back To Ireland And Me

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Ronald F. Wakley — London: West & Co., 1916.

Talbot O’Farrell made this his specialty, beginning in 1917, later singing it at the London Palladium and Hammersmith Palace (May 1918), Victoria Palace (December 1919), London Palladium (September 1921), Alhambra [London] (January 1923), South London Palace (April 1930), Holborn [London] Empire (September 1930), London Pavilion (January 1934).

 

Come For A Sail In My Yacht

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat — London: Monte Carlo Publishing, 1907.

 

Come In My Submarine (A Honeymoon Under The Sea)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


Come Into The Garden, John

Fred Godfrey, Fred D’Albert & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1910.

 

Coo-ee! Coo-ee! (The Anzac Boy)

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1916.

“Miss Lily Iris has secured the prior rights of a big winner from the joint pens of [Mills, Godfrey & Scott] entitled ‘Coo-ee! (The Anzac Boy)’. At the Woolwich Hippodrome on Monday Miss Iris produced the number for the first time, and scored an instantaneous hit, the chorus being taken up heartily by khaki lads in front” (“Variety Gossip,” The Era, 13 September 1916, p. 16).

Recordings: Charlie Collins (Zonophone Twin 1753, 1916); Ella Shields (Columbia 2850, 1918), with title as Coo-ee; same song?

 

Corned Beef

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


The Coster’s Concertina Band

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911, where it is listed as The Concertina Band; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Cross-Words (I Love You)

Ed. E. Bryant, Fred Godfrey & Hubert W. David — London: Worton David, 1925.


Cute

Fred Godfrey & Clarkson Rose, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Dad And Mammy’s Golden Wedding Jubilee

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1918.

Sung by Gracie Fields, Penge [London] Empire (June 1919); and by Tom E. Finglass.

 

Dan, Dan, Dan, The Funny Little Heilan’ Man

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford, [1913?].

Recording: Jack Lorimer Pathé 8806, 1913?)

 

Dance Your Troubles Away

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

Introduced by Florrie Forde at the Palace, Blackpool, 14 May 1913, also sung by her at the Preston Hippodrome and the South London Theatre (June 1913); by Molly McCarthy, Grand, Bolton (September 1913); and by Josie Delaine, Princess, Glasgow (December 1913).

Recordings: Jack Charman (Pelican P-105, ca. 1913); Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1165, 1913); Stanley Kirkby (Columbia-Rena 2176, 1913); Black Diamonds Band, in “Popular Melodies, Part 2” (Zonophone Twin 1242, 1913); Harry Long (Phoenix 056, 1913); Harry Cove (The Winner 2398, 1913)

 

Dancing Days

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.

Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?].

Dancing In My Dreams

Fred Godfrey & Maurice Scott — London: Campbell, Connelly, 1932.

 

Danny O’Doherty’s Dance

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

The Day He Took Me To Wembley

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.

Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?].

 

The Day You Became My Bride

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


The Death Of Rag-Time

Fred Godfrey & William Hargreaves — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

 

Diabolo Mad

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1907; this is not the Billy Williams song, Oh! Diabolo.

Song written to take advantage of a short-lived craze for a Chinese-based game toy called Diabolo (a version of a yo-yo). Sung by Tom Lloyd, Glasgow Palace and other halls (November–December 1907).


The Dickens Ball

words by Eric White, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1919.


Dicky Bird! (Sing! Sing! Any Old Thing)

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

“A feature of the rag-time craze is the fact that the latest rag-time song, entitled ‘Dicky-bird,’ is not American but is written and composed by Englishmen, Harry Gifford and Fred Godfrey [well, not quite; Godfrey was Welsh]. It will be unusual to hear American artists sing an English rag, but the originators of rag-time in this country, the Two Bobs, are making a special feature of this new melody. The day after the song was wriiten it was put on at the Palladium [London], and immediately became a success. Mr. Lawrence Wright, the publisher, has now arranged for ‘Dicky-bird’ to be produced in a novel and original manner by the Palladium Minstrels” (Doss Chiderdoss, “Around the Halls and Suburban Theatres,” Sporting Times, 1 March 1913, p. 9).

Recordings: Frank Curtis (Coliseum 384, 1913); Jack Charman (Marathon 265, 1913); The Two Bobs (Columbia-Rena 2164, 1913)

 

Did You Ever See?

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Dismal Desmond, The Despondent Dalmatian

Richard Ellett, Billie Grey, Fred Godfrey as “Eddie Stamper” & Lawrence Wright as “Everett Lynton” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1926.

Dismal Desmond was a stuffed toy dog that was all the rage in England around Christmas 1926.
Recordings: Bert Firman’s Dance Orch. (Zonophone 2870, 1926); Henry Hearty (Zonophone 2848, 1926); Charles Penrose, with Billie Grey & Company (Columbia 4236, 1926) [also, Doings Of Dismal Desmond, at least 12 parts — same composers?]; Billy Rexter (Coliseum 1980, 1927)

 

The Diver Goes Down And Down

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1936.

Sung by the Wilfred Greene Sextet, Granada, Bedford (May 1936) and Broadway, Stratford (June 1936); by Nell Leslie, Eccles [Lancs.] Kinema (May 1936); by Max Miller [from sheet music cover]. Possibly interpolated in the Tom Moss revue Hail Prosperity, Aldershot Hippodrome (May 1936).


Do A Tango Dance With Me

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

Do I Love You? Yes, I Do

Fred Godfrey as “Eddie Stamper” & G. Williams [Lawrence Wright as “Gene Williams”?] — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1926.

 

Do They All Go To See The Sea?

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.


Do You Always Tell Your Wife?

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman; New York: Jerome Remick, 1913.

Sung by Harry Gordon, Beach Pavilion, Dundee (June 1913).


Doh, Ray, Me, Fah, Soh, Lah, Te, Doh

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller (HMV BD-533, April 1938), reissued on CD “Max Miller, Vol. 2: The Pure Gold Of The Music Hall” (Pearl PAST CD 9736, 1991)

 

Don’t Be Blue

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.

Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?].

 

Don’t Forget Your Little Dickey Bird

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.
Sung by S.W. Wyndham at the Palace Theatre, Burnley, December 1913.


Don’t Go Out With Him Tonight

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams; British Library credits Godfrey, Williams & Alfred Glover; EMI credits Godfrey & Glover; Harry Carlton also a co-author, according to Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911.

 

Don’t Let Me Get Any Better, Nurse

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 832, 1912)

 

Don’t Say Goodbye

Fred Godfrey, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911.


Don’t Sing A Song About A Rose To Me

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 832, 1912)

                                                            

Don’t Tell Nell

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1932.
Sung by Billy Leo, New Pavilion, Morecambe [Lancs.] (June 1932); and by Sam Rayne in Tom Vernon’s Royal Follies, Central Pier, Blackpool (May 1932)..

 

Don’t Tell The Wife!

Fred Godfrey, Harry Castling & John A. Glover-Kind — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.


Don’t You Ever Want To See That Old Hometown?

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.

 

Down A Little Street

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Down In Dolly Town

Fred Godfrey & Alf J. Lawrance — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.

 

Down In Virginia

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1919.

 

Down On The Beautiful Rhine

words by Fred Godfrey & Fred W. Leigh, music by Fred Godfrey [Library of Congress]; Francis, Day & Hunter consignment form dated 13 December 1906 credits Godfrey only — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

Sung by Maude Percival.


Down Our Farm

Fred Godfrey, [pre-World War I?]; fragment of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Down Texas Way

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman; Melbourne, Dinsdales’, 1917; Toronto; New York: Leo Feist, 1921.


A Dream Of Asia

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.

Interpolated in the Francis Laidler pantomime Aladdin, Royal, Nottingham (1930); and in Arthur White’s revue Carry On Sammy, Empire, Birmingham (April 1931), Portsmouth Hippodrome (June 1931), and many othertheatres, 1931–32; it is not known if A Dream Of Asia was kept in the show throughout the run.


Drinking Song

Fred Godfrey, date unknown; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. 

 

Egyptian Rose

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.

Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?]

.

The End Of The Rainbow Trail

Fred Godfrey, 1923.


An Entente Cordiale In La Belle France

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.


Esau

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

  

The Eskimo (Zam Dammy, Zam Dammy, Zam Buk Joe)

Fred Godfrey, Fred E. Cliffe & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

 

Every Fellows Got A Girl But Me

Fred Godfrey, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 17 July 1913.

 

Everybody Knows Where You Live

Fred Godfrey, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911.

 

Everybody’s Happy Up In Blackpool

Fred Godfrey, Tom Mellor & Harry Gifford — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.


Everything Happens To Me

Max Miller & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1938; American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) lists publisher as EMI April Music.

Interpolated by Max Miller in the film Everything Happens To Me (1938).

Recordings: Max Miller (HMV BD-697, 1938), reissued on LP “The Golden Age of Max Miller” (Music for Pleasure GX-2503, 1980), reissued on 2-cassette set “The Cheeky Chappie” (EMI ECC-10, 1990), reissued on CD “Max Miller, Volume 2: The Pure Gold Of The Music Hall” (Pearl PAST CD 9736, 1991); Jack Buchanan (Columbia DB-2127, 1938)


Ev’ry Girl Loves A Military Man!

Fred Godfrey, John P. Harrington & Orlando Powell — London; New York: Bert Feldman, 1910.

“[A] new semi-martial but distinctly humorous and ‘gingery’ number” (The Era, 29 January 1910, p. 22), sung by Lilian Herlein at the Tivoli, London (May 1910); by Miss Chummie La Mara at the Tivoli, Barrow-in-Furnace (April 1010).


Ev’rybody Calls Her Rosa (My Little Mimosa Girl)

Alf J. Lawrance & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

 

Fancy You Remembering That

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

Fanny Isn’t Fickle Anymore

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

Fed Up And Far From Home

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John F. Barth (originally published in 1910 by Sam Fox Publishing, Cleveland) — London: Sam Fox Publishing; Keith Prowse Music, 1941.

Recording: Royal Air Force Community Singing, in “R.A.F. Choruses” (RAF 9, charity recording for the RAF Benevolent Fund, 1942)

 

The Feller That Played The Pianner

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony; British Library & Library of Congress credit Godfrey only — London: Mac Melodies, 1936.

Recordings: Leslie Sarony (Regal Zonophone MR-2092, 1936); Casani Club Orchestra, directed by Charlie Kunz (Rex 8763, 1936), reissued on CD “Clap Hands, Here Comes Charlie” (Pearl PAST CD 9730, 1991)

 

A Fellow Without A Lady Is The Odd Man Out

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Fly Away To Fairyland

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

 

Follow The Sergeant

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1915.

 

Fortune’s Fool

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Frisco Days

Jay Whidden & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.

 

Front Page News

words by Fred Godfrey, music by J. Ord-Hamilton as “Hal Stanton”; British Library credits Ord-Hamilton alone and under his real name; Library of Congress credits Godfrey and Ord-Hamilton — London: Mac Melodies; Melbourne: L.F. Collin, 1936.

Recordings: Leslie Hutchinson (Parlophone F620, 1936); Sydney Lipton & His Grosvenor House Band (Decca F-6228, 1936)

 

Galloping Gus

Fred Godfrey as “Eddie Stamper”, Richard Ellett & Charles Penrose — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1927.
As with Dismal Desmond, this was probably written to take advantage of a toy fad, a horse named Galloping Gus.


The Garden Of Flowers

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

   

The Garden Party (In The Old Back Yard)

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Gee! I Feel A Different Fellow, Kid

Fred Godfrey, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 20 July 1911.

 

Gee! That’s Going Some For You

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Frank Howard, 1914.


Georgie! I Like The Photograph!

Worton David & Fred Godfrey — London: Von Tilzer Music, 1909.
High hopes were had for this one, about which The Era (29 March 1909) reported,“The publishers [unnamed] are at the present moment negotiating with one of the biggest variety artists for a production both in this country and America.”

 

Gibralter

Fred Godfrey — London: Monte Carlo Publishing, 1907.
“A song that is being much sought after by pantomime producers and principals alike is the strikingly original number, written and composed by Mr. Fred Godfrey, entitled ‘Gibralter.’ In rhythmical verse wedded to an ear-haunting march melody, this favourite author-composer recounts the story of the amatory advances of a British sailor, in pusuit of the heart and hand of a ‘tawny’ denizen of the region which gives the song its title, and the subsequent dénouement is of a succeedingly humorous character” (“Songs, Writers, and Singers,” The Era, 2 November 1907, p. 25).


Give Me Your Love For Keeps

Bennett Scott, Fred Godfrey & A.J. Mills — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1919.
Introduced by Peggy Walsh and Mollie Milne; sung by Joyce Lyn in revue Have You Got Me, Empire, Burnley (June 1920).

 

Give My Love To Scotland, Maggie

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.


Giving A Donkey A Strawberry

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913.

 

Go Away, Mister Misery

Fred Godfrey & R.P. Weston — London: Star Music, 1913.
Sung by Miss Jen Latona & The Palladium Minstrels in summer 1913..


Go To Mother

John P. Harrington, Orlando Powell & Fred Godfrey  — 1910.
Song given to Marie Lloyd (The Era, 29 January 1910, p. 22), but it is not known if she ever performed it..

 

Going Home

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Francis, Day & Hunter, 1921.

Song introduced by Daisy Wood. “We have frequently remarked of late that ‘Going Home’, the clever comedy number for which Fred Godfrey is responsible, gains fresh admirers every day. We listened to Lottie Lennox working the song the other evening, and found it a most refreshing experience. Miss Lennox gets every ounce out of ‘Going Home’, and is, in short, a conspicuous success in a number that fits her act like the proverbial glove” (“Our Portrait Gallery,” The Era, 22 February 1922, p. 20).

 

Golden Eyes

Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


Good Luck, Little French Soldier Man

Leslie Leonard Cooke & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

Goodbye Dear Old Scotland

Fred Godfrey, 1907; title from Stationers Hall entry in the Public Record Office, Kew, London, which lists the songs first performance as at The Empire, Oldham, Lancashire, 28 March 1907.

 

Good-bye, Mr. Misery

Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1913.

 

Good-bye, Rag-time! [see also Ragtime]

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 17 July 1913.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. November 1913 for Edison Blue Amberol); (25 August 1913 for Zonophone [UK and Australia]; reissued on HMV-Victor [Canada])

 

Good Night, Mr. Kangaroo

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1907; Library of Congress lists as 1908.

 

A Grain Of Help Is Worth A Peck Of Pity

Fred Godfrey & John F. Lambe — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
Sung by Billie Burford, “a dashing comedienne, who does not fail to make use of a good voice in her numbers” (The Era, 9 November 1907, p. 27), at the Middlesex Music Hall, London (November 1907).


The Grandest Song Of All

Fred Godfrey, according to British Library, American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), and published sheet music; the Performing Right Society also credits Harry Parr-Davies — London: Chappell, 1940.


The Greatest Show On Earth

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Grecian Garden

Fred Godfrey, 1911; manuscript of fragment of lyrics in author’s collection; title also mentioned in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911.

 

Grow, Little Mushroom, Grow

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, [1906]; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1908.

Sung by Winnie Volt in the show Humpty Dumpty, Prince’s, Bristol (December 1906); by Rosie Osborne at the Memorial Hall, Topsham (November 1909) — “Miss Rosie Osborne, whose tuneful voice and winning manner are so well known, gave what was, perhaps, the gem of the evening — the song ‘Grow, little mushroom, grow’” (Exeter and Plymouth Gazette, 8 November 1909, p. 5).

 

Guess I’ll Have To Telegraph

Fred Godfrey, 1911; manuscript of fragment of lyrics in author’s collection; title also mentioned in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911 and 19 December 1911.

 

Hallo, Baby (Introduce Me To Your Nursie)

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey, 1915.

Recording: The Two Filberts (Jumbo 1313, 1915)

 

Hands Up! (Dare-Devil Baby Joe) [EMI database lists title as Dare Devil Baby Joe]

words by R.P. Weston, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1913.


The Happy Song

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung by Nita Croft in pantomime Mother Goose, King’s, Edinburgh (December 1930).

 

Have Another One

Charles Whittle, Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Francis & Day, 1910.

Introduced by Charles R. Whittle; The Era (13 August 1910, p. 19) credits “those past-masters of their art, Harry Castling and Fred Godfrey.”


Have You Got Another Girl At Home Like Mary?

Alf J. Lawrance & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Allen, 1908.

 

Have You Met A Girl Named Mary?

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. DAlbert — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.
Sung by Miss Vena Valma at the Surrey Theatre, South London (July 1910).

 

He Left His Little Chrysanthemum (Over In Tokyo)

Fred Godfrey & Orlando Powell — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

He Played The Wedding March
Ed. E. Bryant, Fred Godfrey & Hubert W. David — London: Worton David, 1924.
A hit primarily for Florrie Forde, who sang it at the London Shoreditch (May 1924), Ardwick Empire (May 1924), Palace, London (June 1924), New Theatre, Cambridge, where “[r]ecords at the house were broken, and the choruses of her songs...were sung lustily by audiences” (The Stage, 11 September 1924, p. 13), and the Empire, Edinburgh (September 1924), where the song is described as “characteristically goey” (Scotsman, 16 September 1924, p. 9. Also sung by Florence Butler in revue Top Speed, Theatre Royal, Worthing (November 1924); by Will Catlin’s Concert Party, Colwyn Bay (summer 1924); by Dinkie Jeune, Belfast Hippodrome (May 1924); and by numerous other artistes, including Alfredo at Prince’s Restaurant, Marjorie Fulton, Morris & Vane, Annie Rooney, May Stevens, Vera Wooten, and Mme Zillah. As well, “Reg. Wentworth is taking ‘He Played The Wedding March’ to South Africa to feature on his tour there” (The Era, 28 May 1924, p. 19).

 

He Used To Play On The Oboe

Fred Godfrey & Charles Hilbury — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909; title appears in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 28 February 1909.


The Heart Of Molly Malone

Worton David, Lawrence Wright & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915; Lawrence Wright Music printed catalogue and report in The Stage (9 September 1915) list this song title but composed by Eileen O’Shea.
Sung by the Femina Quartet. .

           

Heigh Ho! For The Gay Naughty Nineties

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Hello Canada!

Fred Godfrey & George Formby, Jr. — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [ca. 1947]; song written for Formbys 1947 tour of Canada.

Recording: Private recording of performance by George Formby Jr., on ABC-TV (U.K.) show Atlantic Showboat, aired 10 January 1959

 

Hello! Little Miss Llewellyn

Fred Godfrey, Billy Williams & Charles Wilmott — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912 [sheet music; Library of Congress has words by Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, music by Charles Wilmott, and copyright date of 1913].
Song likely was inspired by the 1912 London stage hit Little Miss Llewellyn. Sung by Madeleine Braye, Kursaal Cinerama, Bognor Regis (December 1913).

 

Hello Little Miss U.S.A.

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Star Music, 1913; Bert Feldman, 1913; New York: Jos. W. Stern, 1914.

 

Hello! Little Snowflake

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.
Sung by Violet Miller, Beach Pavilion, Aberdeen (July 1914).

 

Hello, Mister Right

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

 

Hello There Flanagan

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1919.
Sung by Florrie Forde at the South London Theatre (June 1919) and featured in her engagement [at Douglas Head?], Douglas, Isle of Man (summer 1919).

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1932, 1919)

 

Her Ladyship’s Fallen In Love

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Here Comes The Ragman

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


Here, There And Everywhere

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1662, 1915)

 

Here We Are Again

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1938 [Library of Congress].

 

Here You Are Again, Miss Crinoline [also known as Here We Are Again, Miss Crinoline! and as Miss Crinoline]

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music; Bert Feldman, 1915.

Interpolated in the Frank Ruben production Mind The Step, Islington [London] Empire (May 1915). Sung by Minnie Elsie in revue Cupid’s Club, Penge [London] Empire (May 1916).


Here’s The Antelope!

Fred Godfrey — London: Reeder & Walsh, 1908.

 

He’s A Very Old Friend Of Mine

E.W. Rogers & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910; Melbourne: Allen & Co., 1911.
Sung by Madge Temple, Hippodrome, Devonport (March 1911), Hippodrome, Sheffield (May 1911), and Palace. Manchester (September 1912). “Two crowded houses gave a hearty welcome to Miss Madge Temple at the Hippodrome. Her success in musical comedy...is well remembered, and since she went on the halls her songs have placed her in the front rank of variety artists. Dressed in smart tailor-made costumes and wearing costly hats, she adopts the latest fashions. She has a winning manner and an excellent voice, and was soon popular with her audience. She sang ‘He’s a very old friend of mine’” (Sheffield Daily Telegraph, 23 May 1911, p. 9).

Recording: Harry Bluff (Grammavox E-30, [1912?])

 

Hey Ho! Cant You Hear The Steamer?

words by Harry Gifford, music by Fred Godfrey; Star Music “Popsy Wopsy Lancers” sheet music also credits Ella Retford — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1913; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1913.


Hi Ti Iddley, Om, Pom, Pom

Fred Godfrey, 1909; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 23 November 1909.

 

Hilly, Holly, O!

Fred Murray & Fred Godfrey, 1909; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

His Lordship

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — Detroit; New York: Jerome Remick, 1908.

 

Home Guard Blues

George Formby, Jr., Fred Godfrey & Fred E. Cliffe — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1942.

Interpolated by George Formby in the film Get Cracking (1943).

Recording: George Formby Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3689, 1942); reissued on CD “At The Flicks” (President PLCD-554, 1997); reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006); reissued on CD “The Window Cleaner” (Golden Options 3804, 2008)

 

The Honeymoon Train

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1914.

Sung by Alma Harvey in revue The Ranch Girl (The Foresters’ Music Hall, London, 1914); and by The Sisters Reeve: “The Sisters Reeve, who are at the Hippodrome, Southend, this week, are singing...‘The Honeymoon Train’ with success” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 7 May 1914, p. 20). “The Sisters Reeve, who are at the Metropolitan [London] this week,have a winner of the first water in Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills and Bennett Scott’s clever song, ‘The Honeymoon Train,’ which goes with a rare swing, and is eminently suited to their methods” (The Era, 27 May 1914). Also sung by Gipsy Woolf and her girls at the Holborn Empire, May 1914 (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 28 May 1914, p. 19).

Recording: The Two Filberts (Jumbo 35894)

 

Hope, Brothers, Hope

Ralph Butler, Julian Wright & Fred Godfrey — London: Medley Barrett Music, 1929.
Sung by Sandy Powell, Hippodrome, Brighton (May 1929). “From a local friend Medley Barrett has heard that on the arrival of the Prime Minister to his native town, Lossiemouth, the band played ‘Hope, Brothers, Hope,’ and the crowd started to sing the chorus. Somebody gave Mr. [Ramsay] MacDonald one of the sheet copies of the song” (The Stage, 20 June 1929, p. 8).

Recording: Tommy Handley (Piccadilly 345, 1929)

 

House Full O’Love

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


The House With The Little Green Blinds

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].


How Are They All At Home?

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

How Do, Little Miss Santa Claus?

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

Sung by Dorritt MacLaren in pantomime Little Bo-Peep, Tivoli, Hull (December 1914).


How Do, Miss Winter-Time?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


How Do You Do, Miss Summertime?

Fred Godfrey & A.J. Mills — London: Star Music, 1914.

Sung by Daisy May, Leas Pavilion, Folkstone (June 1914).

 

How D’You Do, My Little Sunshine Girl

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of music & lyrics in author’s collection.


How Long Did Solomon Take To Kiss All His Wives Good-Night?

words by Eric White, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1919.


How’s Your Mother, And How’s Your Dad? All Right, Thank You

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

“Billy Cave, the comedian at Fred Clements’s Arcadia, Skegness, is doing well with...‘How’s Your Mother, And How’s Your Dad?’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 3 June 1915, p. 16).

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1496, 1915)

 

How’s Your Mother? She’s All Right!

Fred Godfrey, Will E. Haines & Ralph Butler — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1929.

 

Hullo! Christmas Time

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of music & lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Hullo! Hullo! Hullo! (You’re Carrying On)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

“Fred Barnes is taking up the new song ‘Hello! Hello! Hello! (You’re Carrying On)’. This is a comedy song of the popular type, and rendered by the popular light comedian should have a good send-off” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 3 June 1915, p. 16).

 

Hullo Jack, Glad To See You Back

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

 

Hullo Little Girl, How Do

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


Hullo! Wedding Bells

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Frank Howard, 1914.


A Hundred Years To Come

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.

 

Hurrah For Baden Powell

Fred J. Barnes, Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; typed lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Hurroo! Hurroo! Here We Are Again!

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

I-A-Like-A-You, You-A-Like-A-Me (A Fruitstall Romance) Fred Godfrey & Wynn Stanley — London: Worton David, 1924.
Performed by Jack Hylton & His Famous Band.


I Am Thinking Of You, Just You

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907

 

I Called You Sweetheart

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Ideal Music, 1946.
Performed by Nat Younkman & His Famous Czardas Band.

 

I Can’t Come Tomorrow Night

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.


I Can’t Help Loving A Girl Like You

Fred Godfrey & Dan Lipton — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

 

I Can’t Keep Still Tonight

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. September-October 1913 for Pathé); (ca. October-November 1913 for Jumbo; reissued on Scala, Coliseum, Regal, and Odeon); (ca. November 1913 for Edison Blue Amberol)

 

I Caught [Bought?] A Horse

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller, I Bought A Horse (HMV BD-563, 1938), reissued on LP “The Golden Age Of Max Miller” (Music for Pleasure GX-2503, 1980) [with credit to Miller]

 

 I Come Frae Scotland

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. January-February 1913 for Columbia; reissued on Regal); (ca. March-April 1913 for Favorite); (ca. September-October 1913 for Pathé); (ca. November 1913 for Edison Blue Amberol)

 

 I Didn’t Know What To Do

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 19 December 1911; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

Recordings: Billy Williams (14 March 1912 for Zonophone); (ca. March 1912 for Edison Standard)

 

I Do Like A Little Bit Of Jelly

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

I Do Like The Life, I Do!

Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Star Music, 1916.

Introduced by Daisy Dormer at the Grand, Birmingham (March 1916); also sung by Tiny Arnold, “England’s smallest star comedienne,” Empire, Mansfield (September 1917); by Amy Preston in revue There And Back, at the Bedford, Camden Town (August 1916); and by Winifred Ward.

Recording: Charles Collins (Zonophone Twin 1649, 1916)

 

I Do Like To Be Where The Girls Are

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.

Introduced by George Leyton and featured in a June 1909 advertisement in The Era (but not published until 1911?).

Recordings: Chas. Holland (Columbia-Rena 1735, 1911); Stanley Kirkby as “Arthur Joyce” (Jumbo 749, 1912)

 

I Dont Care

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1939 [Library of Congress]; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

 

I Don’t Care

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.

 

I Dont Know How You Do It

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913.

 

I Don’t Know Where You Live

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams; EMI credits Williams, Charles Collins, Godfrey & Joe Burley — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


I Don’t Know You And You Don’t Know Me

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

 

I Don’t Want To Die For You (I Want To Live)

words by Harry Gifford, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914 [prewar].


I Keep Busy All The Time

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

I Keep On Toddling Along

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams; some record labels credit Williams, Godfrey, Paul Pelham & Herbert S. Rule or Pelham & Rule alone; EMI credits Godfrey alone, 1911.

 

I Knew I Loved You When You Went Away

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

I Like Your Company

Will E. Haines, Harry Staunton & Fred Godfrey — Melbourne: Dinsdales’, [date unknown].

 

I Live Round The Corner — How Can I Go Straight Home?

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton”, 1929.

 

I Love My Motherland

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1916.


I Love To Hear You, Joan, Playing The Saxophone

Fred Godfrey & Alf J. Lawrance — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

 

I May Be A Millionaire

Fred Godfrey & Charles Collins — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

Sung by famed black-face performer Eugene Stratton, no doubt in numerous halls, but those known are the Hackney Empire (July 1910); Nottingham Empire (October 1910); Empire Palace, Sheffield (November 1910, with Jack Lorimer also on the bill; Royal Hippodrome, Belfast (January 1911), and Empire Palace, Edinburgh (April 1911). “Mr. Eugene Stratton, at the Hackney Empire on Monday, was the recipient of roars of welcome from two crowded houses, and his new song, ‘I may be a millionaire,’ caused furores. It has an interesting theme and a haunting melody, and the arrangement is one that must satisfy even this most fastidious and artistic of performers. The number, which is written by Fred Godfrey and Charles Collins, is one that will be much sought after” (“Songs, Writers, and Singers,” The Era 23 July 1910, p. 25). From the review of his appearance at the Royal Hippodrome, Belfast:

There are no signs of waning popularity in connection with Eugene Stratton. He remains pre-eminent in the line of entertainment which he did so much to bring into vogue, and in his hands the “coon song scena” exercises as potent a charm as ever with music hall audiences. He has the gift of imparting a distinctive and artistic touch to his performance which places it on a level above the host of imitations familiar to patrons of the variety theatre for years past. Last night [Stratton’s] reception by packed audiences at both performances was quite enthusiastic, and his new song, “I may be a millionaire,” was a big success. (Northern Whig, 17 January 1911, p. 3)

Recording: Eugene Stratton (HMV 02391, 1911), reissued on LP “Play Another Before You Go” (Topic 12-TMH-781, 1984); reissued on 4-CD set “A Night At The Music Hall” (JSP, 2007)

 

I Met Alice

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 24 June 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.


I Never Heard Father Laugh So Much Before

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, composed 1911; published London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Allan & Co., 1912.

 

I Parted My Hair In The Middle

Worton David, C.W. Murphy & Fred Godfrey, 1914.

Recording: George Formby (Zonophone Twin 1336, 1914) [this may be an error, as Formby Sr. is not known to have recorded any Godfrey songs].

 

I Ran Straight Home With The News

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. Cliffe — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.


I Suppose You’ll Come Down There Too

Arthur Woodville, Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

I Want Somebody To See Me Home

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.

 

I Want To Be A Russian Dancer

Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 4 April 1912.

 

I Want To Be Introduced, If It’s A Girly Girl

Fred Godfrey & Terry Sullivan — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

 

I Want To Land In Ladyland

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey  — 1910.
Song written for Vesta Tilley (The Era, 29 January 1910, p. 22)..

 

I Want To Marry A Hero

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


I Want To Roller-Skate, Johnny

Fred Godfrey, Tom Mellor, T.W. Thurban & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.


I Want You To See My Girl

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1908.


I Was A Fool

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Andrew Allen, collectively as “Manny Romanz” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1923.

Sung by Victoria Carmen; by Florrie Forde; by Mr. T.B. Seymour & Miss Marjorie Brookes in revue Flickers And Flashes, Theatre Royal, Stratford, London (March 1924) and King’s, Newcastle (August 1924); and by Violet Trevelyan, New Cross Empire, London (May 1924); played instrumentally by Norris Smith & His Dixie Entertainers, Regent Dance Hall, Brighton (March 1924). The publisher advertised the song as “A New Departure in Ballads...Intensely Human, Indescribably Appealing” (The Era, 7 May 1924, p. 6).

Recording: The Blackpool Winter Garden Orch. (The Winner 4039, 1924)

 

I Was Lonely And You Took Me In

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.


I Will Love You More Than Ever

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1925.
Sung by Chester Barclay at the Pier Pavilion, Isle of Wight (September 1925); by Wyndham Clare at the Royal, Leicester (July 1925). Talbot O’Farrell included it in his act, singing it at the Grand, Clapham (February 1926) and the Victoria Palace (April 1926), where he “stop[ped] the programme with his beautiful rendering” (The Stage, 22 April 1926, p. 4); sung by George Leslie & Dorothy Tyrell at the Opera House, Coventry (October 1925); by Edie Raby in revue Let’s Have One, Hippodrome, Maidenhead (October 1925); and by La Tagarte, Palace, Chester le Street (July 1925); performed by Julian Ross with His Rothesay Entertainers (August 1925).


I Wish I Were Back In Lancashire

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; manuscript of music in author’s collection.

Recordings: Billy Williams (21 August 1912 for Zonophone; reissued on Ariel Grand and HMV-Victor [Canada]); (ca. March 1913 for Edison Blue Amberol).

 

I Wish I Were You, To-Night

Will Letters, Fred Godfrey & Alf. J. Lawrence — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

Recording: Arthur Leslie? (Columbia-Rena 1418, 1910)

 

I Wish It Was Sunday Night

Billy Williams, Huntley Trevor & Fred Godfrey, 1911; published London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.

 

I Wish That I Knew Your Little Sister

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.


I Wonder

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams?, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

I’d Be Happy In A Wigwam With You

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.


I’d Like To Be On The Farm (If The Darn Thing Were Only Somewhere In Town)

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
Sung by Jack Charman & Billy Cooper, Edmonton Empire (June 1920); by Minnie Cole in pantomime Humpty Dumpty, King’s, Manchester (December 1920), Metropole, Manchester (January 1921); by Kitty Colyer in revue Patches [numerous halls] (1921); by Esme & Dolores in pantomime, Royal, Bristol (December 1920-January 1921); by Tom E. Finglass in numerous halls (1920), including Lewisham Hippodrome (July 1920). Also sung by Victoria Carmen (April 1920); Lane & Dixon, “The Tailor-made Girls” (August 1920), Fred Morris (May 1920); Billy Quantrill (March 1921); The Scroungers (October 1920); and Reg Vincent (January 1921), all in unknown halls.

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone 2024, 1920)

 

Idaho

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1919.
Described in Star Music advertisement as a “novelty chorus song” (The Era, 21 May 1919, p. 16); sung by Fred Collier (October 1923); by Flora Cromer (from sheet music cover); by J.C. Max at the Argyle, Birkenhead (1919); and by Daisy Wood. Not to be confused with the song I Want To Go To Idaho (Mellor-Lawrance-Gifford) made famous by G.H. Elliott.

 

Idolising

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1922.


If Everyone Did A Good Turn Every Day

Fred Godfrey — London: Mac Melodies; Melbourne: L.F. Collin, 1936.

Recording: Leslie Sarony (Regal Zonophone MR-2147, 1936)

 

If Mother Had Never Met Father

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 March 1912 and 4 April 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.


If Only You Remember, The Rest Can All Forget

Worton David, Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


If She Has An Irish Way With Her (Shure Her Heart’s All Right)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

 

If That’s What You Call Lovin’

Lawrence Wright, Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

If The World Belonged To Me

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton, 1911.


If This Should Meet The Eye

Fred Godfrey — Melbourne: Dinsdales’, [ca. 1913].
Sung by Violet Stockelle, who was Daisy Dormer’s sister. Her great granddaughter, “Music Hall Alice,” has a wonderful and informative site at https://musichallalice.wordpress.com/.

 

If We Can’t Be Sweethearts, Let’s Be Friends

Fred Godfrey & Maurice Scott — London: Lareine, 1929.
Sung by Dot Stephens in revue The Yellow Hand (October–December 1929).


If You Come From Yorkshire (By Gum, Tha’s Reet Up T’Mark)

Fred Godfrey & Shaun Glenville — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.
Sung by Shaun Glenville in pantomime at the Grand, Leeds (January 1916)

 

If You Haven’t Got A Girl In The World

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Bert Feldman, [1909?].

Interpolated in pantomime Cinderella, Opera House, Coventry (December 1909). 

 

If You Only Knew

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1916.

Recording: Lewis James (HMV-Victor 216352, 1922)

 

If Your Hair Were Not So Curly

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1907.
According to the trade paper promotion, “Managers and artists unanimously proclaim Castling and Godfrey’s ‘If your hair were not so curly’ the prettiest and most suitable song on the market this season for duet purposes” (The Era, 7 December 1907, p. 28).

 

If Your Heart Says Be A Sailor

Fred Godfrey & R.P. Weston, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


I’ll Always Save The Loving For You

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
Sung by Florrie Forde.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 2175, 1921)

 

I’ll Be Waiting At The Church For Mary Brown

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 24 June 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Ill Have To Ask My Mother If Shell Let Me

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1914.


Ill Lend You My Best Girl

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London : Bert Feldman, 1910.


I’ll Saw His See-Saw Down

A.J. Mills, Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Melbourne: Dinsdales’; New York: Nove Music, 1909.
Sung by Frank Dunlop in pantomime Robinson Crusoe, Theatre Royal, Bristol (January 1910); by Lily Lena in the United States; and by Herbert Rule in theatres in Britain and Australia (1909).

Recordings: Harry Fay (The Twin 231, 1909); Terry Dean (Columbia-Rena 1257, 1910); Herbert Rule (Pathé 8152)

 

I’ll Tell Tilly On The Telephone [also known as I’ll Tell Her On The Telephone]

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
Introduced by Dora Lyric and sung by her in numerous halls, including the Hippodrome, Hull (July 1907) and the Palace, Stoke Newington (September 1907) — “A turn much to the liking of the audience is that provided by Miss Dora Lyric. Miss Lyric sings two songs, [‘I’ll Tell Tilly On The Telephone’ and one other],and the choruses of both of these are most enthusiastically and vociferously taken up by the members of the audience, most of whom seem to be already well acquainted with this lady’s songs” (The Era, 14 September 1907, p. 24). Dora Lyric also sang the song at an all-star benefit for popular theatre manager (Empress Theatre of Varieties, Brixton Hill, London) Nelson Francis (November 1907). The song was also sung by Marie Ashton in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Theatre Royal, Glasgow (December 1907); by Miss Mayme Cannon at the Canterbury, London (August 1907), where Harry Lauder was top of the bill; by Daisy Dormer in “Mr. Fred W. Wyndham’s gorgeous Glasgow annual” (December 1907); by Mimi Fisher in pantomime The Fair One With The Golden Locks, Theatre Royal, York (December 1907); by Meg Hamylton in pantomime Cinderella, Royal Court, Liverpool (February 1908); and by Constance Hyam in pantomime Aladdin, Grand, Leeds (December 1907).

 

Perhaps attesting to its transatlantic appeal, the song was also borrowed for a British jibe at American politics: “So irritable, we understand, has Senator [Benjamin] Tillman grown under the charges made against him by President [Theodore] Roosevelt, that the popular song among those who have to apprise the Senator of the march of events is ‘I’ll Tell Tilly On The Telephone’” (“By the Way,” Globe and Traveller, 13 January 1909, p. 1). The same anonymous columnist evidently had a thing for the song, having written a few months earlier: “In regard to the North Shropshire election, we read that ‘at Tilly, a few miles out of Wem, Tariff Reform speakers had to beat a retreat followed by volleys of stones.’ Afterwards, we understand, one of them was heard singing that deservedly popular melody ‘I’ll Tell Tilly On The Telephone’” (“By the Way,” Globe and Traveller, 9 May 1908, p. 1).

Recording: Harry Fay (Columbia D-131, 1908)

 

I’m A Little Bit Of Pre-War Stuff

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

I’m A Member Of The Cuckoo Club

Worton David & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1914.

Inroduced by Reg Wentworth.


I’m A Slop

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Barclay — 1926.

Written for Vesta Victoria‘s return to the Variety stage; sung by her at the Victoria Palace, London (March 1926). .

 

I’m Coming Back To Old Kilkenny

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.
Sung by Dorothy Ward at the Royal Hippodrome, Belfast (May 1915).


I’m Coming Your Way Home

Terry Sullivan & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1909.
Sung by Minnie Love at the Grand Theatre, Luton (September 1910).

 

I’m Going Back

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Barclay — 1926.

Written for Vesta Victoria‘s return to the Variety stage; sung by her at the Victoria Palace, London (March 1926).

I’m Going Tomorrow, Today

Fred Godfrey & Fred Curran — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.
Sung by Fred Curran.


I’m Gonna Be Married Sunday

Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.
Sung by Marie Braymen, Alhambra, London (December 1926); and by Stella White in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Royal Darlington [and other theatres] (January 1927).

 

I’m Madly In Love

Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

I’m Not A Baby Any More

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.

 

I’m Not Going Away From This Little Lagoon With You

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.
Sung, according to the sheet music cover, by Josie Delaine Gallimore.

 

I’m Off To Kelly’s Isle

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

Introduced by Florrie Forde.


I’m On My Way To Bom-Bombay

Fred Godfrey — London: Montgomery, 1927.
Sung by Bond Rowell, Pavilion, Ayr [and other Scottish halls] (August 1927).


Im Out For The Day Today

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913.


I’m Taking That Baby Home

Fred Godfrey & Hubert W. David — London: Worton David, 1926.
Very popular with dance bands in 1926, the song was performed by, among others, Alec Alexander’s Radio Novelty Syncopators, Circus Restaurant, Oxford Circus (London) (April 1926); Archie Alexander & His New Columbians, Tottenham Palais de Danse (June 1926); J. Hal Bryan, Central Pier, Blackpool (June 1926); Percy Bush & The London Aeolian Band, Oxford Galleries, Newcastle (June 1926); G.H. Carlisle, London, Shoreditch (January 1927); Dan Carroll & His Decameron Band, Birmingham Palais de Danse (February 1927); Chapman’s London Band, Sheringham (August 1926); the Cuban Band, Cosmo Club [London] (September 1926); Sid Davis, People’s Palace, Mile End (July 1926); Fred Musson, Roundhaye Park, Leeds (May 1926); the Gainsborough Band, Wimbledon Palais de Danse (June 1926); Billy Grant & His Kine Dance Band, New Cross Palais de Danse, London (July 1926); Gray’s Popular Ballroom Orch., Central Hall, Derby (September 1926); Norman Jackson & His Band, Finsbury Park Palais de Danse, London (March 1927); Miss Toto Maxter, Hector’s (January 1927); the New Georgian Band, Wimbledon Palais de Danse (June 1926); Ida Stanley’s Band, Palais de Danse, Edinburgh (April 1926); De’Aar Ternent’s Band, Fenwick’s, Newcastle (September 1926); and The Three Rascals, Chiswick Empire, London (March 1926). In addition, popular Australian-born Music Hall star Albert Whelan sang it at the Holborn Empire (September 1926, January 1927) and the Palladium, London (October 1927).

Recordings: The Edison Bell Dance Orch.; Tom Barratt, vocal (Edison Bell Winner 4444, 1926); Jack Hylton & His Orchestra; Jack Hylton, vocal (HMV B-5099, 1926); Billy Mayerl & His Orch. (Vocalion X-9842, 1926); Ronnie Munro & His Dance Orch.; Scovell & Wheldon, vocals (Parlophone E-5634, 1926)

 

I’m The Only Bit Of Comfort That She’s Got

Fred Godfrey & J. Lloyd as “James Walsh”, [1938?]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.
Recording:
Max Miller (HMV BD-505, 1938), reissued on LP “The Golden Age Of Max Miller” (Music for Pleasure GX-2503, 1980), with credit to Miller alone.

 

In A Cheap Excursion Train

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Shapiro; New York: Von Tilzer Music, 1908.
Introduced by Miss Billie Burford; sung by her at the Swindon Empire (September 1908) [and other halls].

 

In Demerara

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
Sung by Marie Kendall (September 1907).


In Early Victorian Days

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

In Honeymoon Land

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.
Sung by male impersonator Miss Marion Scott at Her Majesty’s, Dundee (April 1915) and at the Empire, Belfast (May 1915); by Park’s Eton Boys & The Girton Girls, Empire, Mansfield (October 1916) and at the Hippodrome, Derby (August 1917); by Minnie Myrle & George Leyton in play Over The Top, New Theatre, Cambridge (October 1917) and the Hippodrome, Derby (December 1917); by Maud Hughes & Albert Le George in revue The Fisher Girl, Tivoli, Hull (October 1918). Interpolated in musical comedy C.O.D., Grand, Derby (December 1918).

 

In My Aeroplane (Jane-Jane-Jane)

Fred Godfrey, 1906; published London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907; title included in Francis, Day & Hunter consignment form, 13 December 1906.
Described as a“strictly up-to-date song...secured by Messrs. Francis and Day” in The Era, 22 December 1906.


In My Home At Bantry Bay

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.
“Harry Castling and Fred Godfrey, who are in the very first flight of writers for the variety stage, have just placed a number...for which a great vogue is anticipated. The title is as picturesque as the song is refined and melodious, the name given it being ‘In my home at Bantry Bay’” (“Songs, Writers, and Singers,” The Era, 4 June 1910, p. 21).


In My Little Cabin Home Out West

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.


In My Little Jungle Home

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.


In My Subterranean Home I’m Going To Stay

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.

In Old Kashmir

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.

 

In That Little Irish Town

Fred Godfrey — London: Montgomery, 1927.

 

In The Days That Are Coming By-And-By (The Budget Song)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey, 1909.
Recordings:
Mark Sheridan (Jumbo 430, 1909; Coliseum 504, 1909); Terry Dean (Columbia-Rena 1328, 1910); Harry Fay (Cinch 5175, 1914)

 

In The Fire-Fly Glow

A.E. Sidney-Davis, Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.


In The House Next Door To Me

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 5 June 1912 and 24 June 1912; manuscript of music in author’s collection.


In The Island Of Go-As-You-Please

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music; National Publishing, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 22 March 1913.

Sung by Charles R. Whittle, Grand, Derby (June 1913).
Recordings:
Chas. Holland (Columbia-Rena 2124, 1913) for a Vitagraph singing picture; Stanley Kirkby (Pathé 8743, 1913); Jack Charman (Edison Blue Amberol 23090, 1913) [cylinder]

 

In The Land Of The Kangaroo

Fred Godfrey, Percy Edgar & T.W. Thurban — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.
Performed at the Hippodrome, Belfast (December 1908); and by Daisy Dormer [in unknown halls].

 

In The Land Where The Heather Grows

Fred Godfrey & Fred D’Albert, 1910.

Recordings: Jack Lorimer (Jumbo 471, 1910; Edison Amberol 12240, ca. 1911 [4-min. wax cylinder])

 

In The Land Where The Women Wear The Trousers

Fred E. D’Albert, Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1909.

 

In The Land Where There Are No Girls

Fred Godfrey & Orlando Powell — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

 

In The Merry Month Of May

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.
Sung by Mabel Green.In the Merry month 1

 

In The Middle Of The Night

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown]; there is a 1927 song of that title, but published by Francis & Day.

 

Is There Room For A Little One?

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton”, 1929.

 

It Doesn’t Cost A Penny For Any Of That

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

It Seems To Me

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.

 

It Takes An Irish Heart To Sing An Irish Song

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1914.

  

It Takes More Than That To Steal An Irish Heart Away

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.

Recording: Arthur Cox (Zonophone 2844, 1926)

 

It’s A Far Better Thing I Do Than I Have Ever Done [also known as ’Tis A Far Better Thing I Do]

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; manuscript of lyrics (two drafts) in author’s collection.

Recordings: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 785, 1912; reissued on Cinch 5115, 1913); (Edison Standard Cylinder 14138, 1912)

 

Its A Grand Old Song Is Home Sweet Home

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912.


It’s A Long Way To Go Home

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

Recording: Gus Harris (Marathon 395, 1914) [vertical cut disc]

 

It’s A Waste Of Time

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 2 May 1912 and 24 June 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


It’s A Wonderful Great Big Love That’s Calling Me Back To You

Tom Mellor & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.


It’s All Through The Wibbly-Wobbly Eye

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Sung by Fred Barnes, Empire, South Shields (September 1915) [and other theatres].

    

It’s An Ill Wind That Blows No Good

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

It’s An Old Scotch Tune They’re Playing

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.


It’s Going To Be A Night, That Night [also known as Oh! It’s Going To Be A Night, That Night]

Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1692, 1916)

 

Its Mine When Youve Done With It

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, composed 1912 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.

 

It’s No Use Going To The Seaside (Unless You’re A Bit Of A Sport)

Will Wise, Bud Bennett & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
Performed, presumably by Florrie Forde, in theatres in Douglas, Isle of Man, and Blackpool (June 1920).

 

It’s Not So Much The Waltz Dream As Her Dreamy Dreamy Eyes

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.
Sung by Gladys Huxley.

 

It’s Not The Band That They Go To See (It’s Her Big Brown Eyes)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


It’s Not The Kilt You’re Wearing

Fred Godfrey, [1912?].

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Jumbo 851, 1912)

 

It’s Nothing To Do With You

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 24 June 1912.


Its The Only Bit Of English That Weve Got

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling [EMI also credits Billy Williams], composed 1906; published London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


It’s The Same Old Tommy And The Same Old Jack!

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey [EMI also credits Alf. J. Lawrence] — London: Bert Feldman, 1914 [prewar].

Sung by Nora Delaney in various halls (November 1914).
Recordings:
Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1433, 1914); Robert Howe (HMV-Victor [Canada] 120319, 1915?)

 

It’s The Way They Have In The Navy

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Frank Howard, 1914 [pre-war].
Sung by Dorothy Ward (June 1914).

 

I’ve Been Out With Johnny Walker

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.
Sung by Hetty King at the London Palladium (January 1915).


I’ve Got A Lad In Yorkshire (Yorkshire Belongs To Me)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

I’ve Got My Mother’s Husband And She’s Got Mine

Vesta Victoria & Fred Godfrey; Library of Congress credits Godfrey only — New York: M. Whitmark & Sons, 1911; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1938 [Library of Congress, which also lists Vesta Victoria there as co-author].


I’ve Got One Arm Round Mary (And The Other Arm Round Her Ma)

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.

Sung by Randolph Sutton at the Coliseum, London (May 1930), Pavilion, Torquay (July 1930), in pantomime, Newcastle (December 1930), Holborn Empire and Metropolitan, London (March 1931), Palladium, London (April 1931), and Alhambra, London (May 1931); by Claude Worth, of the Rothesay Entertainers (August 1930); and by Harry Wray & His White Guards, Canterbury, London (April 1931). Interpolated in Will A. Jackson’s revue Come To The Fair (December 1930). .
Recording: Randolph Sutton, with cabaret orch. (Edison Bell Radio 1343, 1930)

 

I’ve Got Plenty Of Books To Read (Send Me Along A Girl)

Will Letters & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

I’ve Just Been To A Wedding Today

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


I’ve Seen Beautiful Pictures

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [1915?].

Recording: Will Terry (Jumbo 35938)

 

Jack, Jack, Jack, Come Along Back, Back, Back

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1927.
Sung by Victoria Carmen in revue King Of Clubs, Princess’s Theatre, Glasgow (December 1927).


Jane, Ain’t You Coming Home Again?

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Frank Howard, 1914.


Janette

Lawrence Wright as “Horatio Nicholls” & Fred Godfrey as “Godfrey Williams” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1928.


Jean Loves All The Jockeys SEE ALSO Jockey Mad

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


Jean Maclean

Fred Godfrey, 1923.
Introduced in Birmingham by Daisy Taylor (June 1923).

 

Jean Ma Dear Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh, Oh

Fred Godfrey, composed 1906; copyright 1907; title from Stationers Hall entry in the Public Record Office, Kew, London, which lists the song’s first performance at Euston Music Hall, London, 10 November 1906.

 

Jimmy, Take A Chance And Do The Shimmie Dance

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1919.


Jim’s A Funny Fellow When He’s Had A Few

Fred J. Barnes & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; typed lyrics, with corrections (by Barnes?), in author’s collection.

 

Jockey Mad!

Fred Godfrey, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 7 November 1913 — a reference to the song later called Jean Loves All The Jockeys?

 

John Bull’s Daughters

Fred J. Barnes, Orlando Powell & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

John James Brannigan

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; manuscript of partial lyrics (early draft) in author’s collection.
Recording:
Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 675, 1911; reissued on Cinch 5113, 1913; [Australian] Zonophone 3103, date unknown)

 

Johnny O’Morgan, On His Little Mouth Organ, Playing “Home Sweet Home”

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.
Sung by Lily Lena; and by Elise Malpass in pantomime Dick Whittington And His Cat (Theatre Royal Sheffield (December 1914). The song was popular with the Tommies: “The Fourth Division of the Expeditionary Force possesses a concert party, yclept the Follies, who recently included in their programmes...‘Johnny O’Morgan’. The success of [this number is] such that [it has] become the marching song of the Division” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 29 April 1915, p. 21). The poor old West Pier, Brighton! As a child in the early 1960s, this author lived right around the corner from it, and it was still a goer then. And it once had even glorier days: “The West-End Entertainers, appearing on the West Pier, Brighton, are singing with success...‘Johnny O’Morgan’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 5 August 1915, p. 16).

 

The anonymous writer of the “By the Way” column in the Globe and Traveller (25 February 1915, p. 4), borrowed Johnny O’Morgan to make a dig at a Sudanese religious leader who had been enlisted by Governor-General Reginald Wingate of the Sudan to aid discussions about the future of the Arabian peninsula in the post-Ottoman era: “We read that ‘the great Sheikh, Seyyid El-Morghani is said to be a descendent of the Prophet,’ but we cannot help thinking that he must be some relative of Johnny O’Morgan with his little mouth organ.”

Recordings: George Baker as “George Guest” (Jumbo 35839); Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1447, 1914)

 

Julia (I’ve A Peculiar Feeling Round My Heart For You)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

Just A While Ago

Fred Godfrey & Edgar Leslie, 1918.

Recording: Norman Allin (Columbia 2844, 1918)

 

Just An Ordinary Home

Leslie Leonard Cooke & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


Just To Be Near You

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Lawrence Wright?, [ca. 1913].

Recording: Emilie Hayes (Marathon 296, 1913) [vertical cut disc]

 

Just To Remind Me Of You

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

The Kangaroo Hop

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.


Keep On Smiling

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript [fragment] of lyrics in author’s collection.


Keep Your Flashlight In Your Hand

George Formby, Jr., Amy Parsons & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1939.

 

La Belle France

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Maurice Scott — London: Star Music, 1913.

 

A Lad From Lancashire

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1939.

Recording: George Formby Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3206, 1939), reissued in 4-LP set “The Man With The Ukelele” (World Record Club SM 351-4, 1977); reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006) reissued on CD “The Window Cleaner” (Golden Options 3804, 2008)

 

The Ladder Of Life

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

 

The Ladder Of Roses

Tom Mellor & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916. [A song of the same name was published by Francis & Day in 1916, and the following might refer to it, rather than to the Mellor & Godfrey song, although singer Dorothy Ward was known to favour Godfrey material]
The song began life in a much-talked-about sketch of that name in revue We’re All In It, in which it was sung by Dorothy Ward at the Empire, London (July 1916) — “The Ladder of Roses is a pretty and ingenious affair. At the back of the stage is a trellis. On the other side of it, facing the audience, innumerable pretty girls climb in endless succession. In the centre of the stage, Miss Dorothy Ward sings and dances” (Globe and Traveller, 14 July 1916, p. 3). Another review noted: “[B]eauty reaches its climax in the gorgeous Ladder of Roses, a chain of lovely girls and lovely frocks, which moved and will move its audience to rapture” (Illustrated London News, 22 July 1916, p. 23). Another review helps to set the stage even better: “The great spectacular scene of the revue was the ‘Ladder of Roses,’ but really it was only the Empire girls climbing up ladders on a screen painted with hanging...garlands of pink roses, and going up and up in ordered ranks until they disappeared into the ‘flies.’ It was an exceedingly pretty and memorable scene, but its special success lay almost entirely in the perfect rhythm and joyance with which the Empire girls did their climb to a swinging tune—and they did it without a flaw or a falter” (Pall Mall Gazette, 14 July 1916, p. 8). Also at the Palace, London (August 1916). The sketch then seems to have been moved to the revue Razzle Dazzle, Drury Lane Theatre, London (August 1916).
Recording: Louise Leigh (His Master’s Voice B707, 1916).


The Lancashire Romeo

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1939.

Recording: George Formby Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3233, 1939), reissued in 4-LP set “The Man With The Ukelele” (World Record Club SM-351-4, 1977); reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006)

 

The Last Man

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.
Sung by Victor King, a “popular tenor...[with] a voice of exceptional quality” (The Era, 1 September 1920). .


The Last Train Home Tonight (Puff, Puff, Hear The Whistle Blowing)

words by Harry Gifford, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1300, 1914)

 

Laughterland (A Fantastic Fable)

Fred Godfrey & R.P. Weston — London: Star Music, 1907.


Lead Me Towards The Girls

Fred Godfrey & John A. Glover-Kind — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.
Sung by Harry Simms.


Leading The Simple Life (Arcady)

Fred Godfrey & Terry Sullivan — London; New York: M. Whitmark & Sons, 1911; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1938 [Library of Congress].
Sung by Vesta Victoria at the Ilford Hippodrome (November 1910) — “Vesta Victoria, the queen of domestic comedy, is paying a welcome return visit, and her reception is a very hearty one indeed. With her new songs ‘Uncle Bill’ and ‘Leading the simple life’ she literally ‘brings down the house’” (The Era, 12 November 1910, p. 28).

Recording: Vesta Victoria (Zonophone Twin 761, 1911)

 

Leave Them Alone, They’re Doing Their Best

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript [fragment] of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Let Me Die With My Face To The Foe

words by Fred Godfrey, music by G.F. Barnes — London; New York: Hamilton S. Gordon; Sydney: Joe Slater, 1915?

 

Lets All Go Mad

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; manuscript of two drafts of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Let’s Build A World Of Our Own [EMI has title Let’s Build A World Together]

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

Lets Go Where All The Crowd Goes

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911; Harry Carlton also co-author, according to letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911.


Let’s Have A Little Bit Of Peace

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1944.

 

Lets Have A Song On The Gramophone [Homophone, Graphophone, Pathéphone, Phonograph]

[lyrics change according to the patented playback format for which the recording was made]

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; Harry Carlton also co-author, according to letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911.


Lets Have Another One Together

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1913; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Let’s Have It Over Again

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911; typed version of lyrics and manuscript of music in author’s collection.

 

Let’s Sing The Cuddly Song

Ralph Butler, Julian Wright & Fred Godfrey — London: Cambridge Music, 1929.

 

The Little Back Room Upstairs

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1944.

 

A Little Bit Of Ireland

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

The Little Blue Bonnet Of Mary

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1938.

 

Little Dutch Baby Doll

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung by Miss Bibi Delabère, in Francis Laidler’s pantomime Mother Goose, Theatre Royal, Leeds (December [1929?]).


A Little Dutch Heaven For Two (Anna, My Anna)

A.J. Mills, Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.
Sung by Ruby Kimberley in the Huddlestone & Tiller revue Well! I Never Did, Winter Garden, Blackpool (July 1916).

Recordings: Eric Courtland (HMV B-762, 1916); The Elliotts (The Winner 3075. 1916); Hayes & Croft [or Harry Cove & Will Thompson?] (Coliseum 990); The Two Filberts (Jumbo 1459, 1916 — disc possibly not issued); [unidentified duet] (Popular 787)

 

The Little Grasshopper Hopped Away

Fred Godfrey & Fred D’Albert — 1909.

Possibly sung by Miss Maybelle Morgan, “Australia’s gem chorus singer, youth, voice,. charm, and ability,” Shepherd’s Bush Empire and London Pavilion (April 1909) (The Era, 3 April 1909, p. 40; 10 April 1909, p. 40).

 

Little Green Heaven

words by Harry A. Steinberg as “Dawson Street,” music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1937.
Sung by Talbot O’Farrell, Chelsea Palace (April 1937) and Empress, Brixton (May 1937) — “Talbot O’Farrell is here again after a long absence, and the fact that audiences enjoy keenly his singing and humerous stories is quickly obvious. He has, as always, one or two new songs in his turn, ‘Old Sailor’ [also a Godfrey song] and ‘Little Green Heaven’ amongst them” (The Stage, 14 May 1937, p. 3). From the archives of British Pathé, see newsreel footage from 2 May 1938 of Talbot O’Farrell singing Little Green Heaven: http://www.britishpathe.com/record.php?id=11129. Also sung by Noel Allen.


Little Miss Waltz Time Is Coming Home

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

A Little Red Lamp Burning

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Little Rosalie, My Pretty Refugee [EMI lists title as My Little Rosalie]

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.


Little Skipper

Fred Godfrey & Clarkson Rose, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Little White Home

Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by John Luxton, Victoria Pier, Blackpool (July 1918), for which “he never fails to receive an encore for his fine rendering” (The Era, 3 July 1918, p. 14)..

 

The Little Wooden Chapel (At The Top Of The Hill)

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.

 

Liza’s Wedding Day

Fred Godfrey, Harry Castling & Alice Lloyd, 1910.
Written for sketch by comedy duo Bert Swan and Marie Vesta, performed by them at the Margate Hippodrome (September 1910), Paragon Theatre, London (August 1911), Hulme Hippodrome (October 1911), Leigh (Lancs.) Hippodrome (October 1911), Rotherham Hippodrome (November 1911), Kingston Empire (March 1912), Preston Hippodrome (May 1912), Aldershot Royal (August 1912).

“Swan and Vesta appear in a coster sketch, along with their prize donkey, entitled ‘Liza’s Wedding Day.’ The pair travel to the church in their donkey cart, but quarrel before entering because the groom insists on having a drink prior to the ceremony. In the end, however, the peals of the organ soften the coster’s hear and the wedding proceeds. They leave the church to the accompaniment of the wedding bells and a shower of confetti. It is a characteristic little sketch, and is well received” (Leigh Chronicle and Weekly District Adviser, 6 October 1911, p. 2). “In ‘Liza’s Wedding Day,’ Swan and Vesta have the makings of a first-class sketch. There is a realistic setting, with a church in the background and a convenient public-house to the left. In comes the donkey shay with the bride and bridegroom in full coster equipment. A quarrel delays the marriage ceremony, which, however, eventually takes place with the chimes merrily and the organ pealing a wedding march. The pronunciation is not always orthodox ‘Cockney,’ but that detracts little from the sketch, especially up in the northern counties” (Preston Herald, 22 May 1912, p. 3).

 

Loneliness

Lawrence Wright as “Everett Lynton” & Fred Godfrey as “Godfrey Williams”, 1929; title from EMI database.


Look Alive For The 9.45

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
Interpolated by Mona Vivian in revue Good Evening! (Coventry Hippodrome, 1915).

 

Look What The Naughty 90’s Did For Me

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Love Goes On For Ever And Ever

Fred Godfrey — London: Mac Melodies, [1930s].

 

Love Star

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Lovetime (Any Old Time Will Do)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.
Sung by George Lashwood.


Maggie Jane (You’ve Been At It Again)

Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1931.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Imperial 2455, 1931)

 

Maggie Ryan

Fred Godfrey & J. Lloyd as “James Walsh”, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society; this song likely dates from the late 1920s or 1930s, so is not the song of the same title published by Bert Feldman in 1910.

 

Making Up For Lost Time Now

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown]; this is not the song of the same title by Murray & Everard, published by Francis, Day & Hunter in 1903..

 

Mammy’s Mississippi Home

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott, 1920.
Sung by Tom E. Finglass at the Grand, Bolton (September 1920); and by G.H. Elliott in numerous theatres, including the Hammersmith Palace (October 1920), the Olympia, Shoreditch, Holborn Empire, and Hippodrome, Ilford (all November 1920), the Hippodrome, Aston, and Empire, Hackney (both December 1920).

Recording: G.H. Elliott (Zonophone 2110, 1920)

 

The Man Behind The Drum

Fred Godfrey, 1910; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 December 1910; typed version of lyrics and manuscript of music in author’s collection.

 

The Man In The Street

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Man, Man, Beautiful Man!

Fred Godfrey & Charles Collins, 1908  [title in advertisement in The Era, 25 July 1908]; EMI database also credits Will Driscoll — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

 

Mary, Queen Of Scots

words by Fred E. D’Albert & Fred Godfrey, music by Fred Godfrey [Library of Congress]; some sources also credit Vesta Victoria — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


Mary (Though I Left You In Argyle)

Fred Godfrey & Wynn Stanley — London: Worton David, 1924.
Sung by Florrie Forde; and by Marjorie Fulton in pantomime, Princess’s Theatre, Glasgow (December 1924). Described as a “rattling song” in a newspaper notice of the release of Harry Gordon’s recording (Clifton and Redland Free Press, 27 November 1924, p. 3).
Recording: Harry Gordon (Pathé Actuelle 10732, 1924).

 

Mary’s A Beautiful Name

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1922.
Sung, according to the sheet music cover, by Florrie Forde, and by Miss Esme Willard, who is “featuring an appropriate number just now in view of the royal betrothal” (The Stage, 16 February 1922, p. 3). The reference is to the marriage at Westminster Abbey of Princess Mary, the only daughter of King George V, and Viscount Lascelles, about which one newspaper declared “London is agog with excitement. North, south, east, and west there is an air of joyful anticipation over the event that will be a milestone in the progress of the Empire” (“Gay scenes on eve of royal wedding,” Sunday Post (Glasgow), 26 February 1922, p. 16). Well, perhaps it wasn’t quite, but one never knows how these things will turn out. The newspaper then proceeded to publish the full lyrics of Godfrey’s song in a special sidebar: “A popular song (published by Feldman) that is on everybody’s lips just now is one which has been written round the name of the Princess. Factory girls sing at their work, messenger boys whistle as they trip along the streets, and the barrel-organs and restaurant orchestras proclaim that Mary’s a beautiful name. The story is about a little girl who is dissatisfied with the old-fashioned English name.”

 

Matilda Doesn’t Do It Anymore

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


Meet Me Again — Just Down The Lane

Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.
Performed by Eugene Bowen’s Orchestra, Clacton-on-Sea (May 1927); sung by Marie Brayman [unknown theatres] (December 1926); by the Dalton Sisters, Futurist Kinema, Liverpool (February 1927), ”a number also being broadcast by Eddie Sheldon” (The Stage 10 February 1927, p. 4); by Tom Dixon and Doris Masters in Ruby Kimberley’s pantomime Mother Goose (1926–27 season); by Doris Masters in revue Happy And Snappy (March 1927); by Susie Marney, London, Shoreditch (June 1927) [and numerous other theatres throughout 1927]; by Harry Middleton [unknown theatres] (March 1927); and by Nellie Wigley..


Meet Me Jenny When The Sun Goes Down

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London; Melbourne: Bert Feldman, 1907.
Introduced to London audiences by “dainty” Alice Lloyd, and sung on stage by Hilda Jacobsen (at the Tivoli, London, December 1907), Gertie Millar (at the Gaiety, London, December 1907), Maude Mortimer, and Fred Wyndham. One newspaper report says the song “will be heard in nearly 200 pantomimes this season” (Dundee Courier, 16 December 1907, p. 7); if so, the following list of known panto performances must stand as suggestive only. Sung by Ethel Bryant in Aladdin, Prince’s Theatre, Bradford (February 1908); by Gladys Cooper in The Babes In The Wood, Royal, Glasgow (December 1907); by Edith Haley in Peter Piper, Royal Princess’s, Glasgow (December 1907), where she “was accorded several encores for her singing of [the song]” (The Era, 21 December 1907, p. 12); by Dan Kirton in Little Red Riding Hood, Elephant And Castle, London (December 1907); by Lily Morris in Jack And Jill, Prince’s Theatre, Bristol (December 1907); by Gracie Sinclair in Cinderella, Royal Opera House, Leicester (December 1907); by Dorothy Ward in Humpty Dumpty, Palace, Belfast (January 1908); and by Miss Gipsy Woolf in The Forty Thieves, New Gaiety, Dundee (December 1907) ;

Recordings: Peter Dawson, as “Hector Grant” (Zonophone 50, 1908); Frank Drummond (Columbia D-174, 1908); David Gray (John Bull 40260); Stanley Kirkby as “Charles Lester” (Clarion 123, 1908) [cylinder]; Gertie Gitana (Jumbo 897, 1912), with title Meet Me Jennie — same song?; The Pavement Artists (Regal Zonophone MR-614, 1932)

 

Mendelssohn Mad

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.

 

Miffikins, Where Have You Been?

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Miles O’ Smiles

Fred J. Barnes, Fred Godfrey & R.P. Weston, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


Miss Rebecca Of Sunnybrook Farm

Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Bert Feldman, 1912.

 

Mrs. Sandy McIntyre

Fred Godfrey, 1910.

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Zonophone Twin 551, 1910)

 

The Missis Will Laugh When I Tell Her

Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 27 September 1912 in author’s collection.

 

Mississippi

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Sydney: Chappell, 1922.
“Fred Godfrey’s latest (and we shouldn’t be surprised if it turned out his greatest) composition ‘Mississippi’ vocal-waltz is certainly attracting a lot of favourable attention. The latest act to ‘cotton on’ is that of the Four K-Foleys, who will work it as a quartet” (The Stage, 2 February 1922, p. 5). This popular number was performed by many artistes in theatres up and down the United Kingdom, including Leon Bassett & His Orch., Metropolitan, London (February 1922); by Broughton & Creedon at the Olympia, Shoreditch (August 1922); by Frank Butcher in pantomime The Babes In The Wood, King’s Theatre, Manchester (December 1922); by the Canadian Military Singers, Bradford (February 1922); by Felix Godin & the Villa Marina Orchestra, Douglas, Isle of Man (July 1922); by Leslie Carter in Ayrshire, Scotland, where “‘Mississippi’ holds premier position, having a greater number of requests to its credit than any other number in our rep” (The Stage, 6 July 1922, p. 3); by Freda Francis, Woolwich Empire (February 1923); by Frank Mundill’s Orch., Surrey Music Hall (November 1922); by Rose Murray in pantomime Cinderella, Whitestone Pavilion, Weston-super-Mare (January 1923); by Alec Regan in revue 1922 (February 1922); by the Royal Dominion Singers, Metropolitan, London (February 1922); by Hope Vernon; and in Australia by Patti Hill & Vernon Sellars. One of those who sang it with success was Jack Cranston, “lead” in the revue Pin Wheel, who was married to Fred Godfrey’s younger sister Gladys after whom his eldest daughter was named.

Recording: Alfred Hastings & J. Jameson (Guardsman 1262, 1923)


Mister Hippopotamus

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

 

Mr. John Mackenzie, O

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913; manuscript of partial lyrics (scribbled on the back of a sheet of Williams & Godfrey stationery) in author’s collection.

 

Mister Sergeant Michael Donoghue

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1630, 1916)

 

Mr. Smith, From Aberystwith!

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Monte Carlo Pubs., 1907.

“Messrs. Harry Castling and Fred Godfrey have just supplied the Monte Carlo Publishing Company with a comedy number, recording the adventures of a Welshman who has got ‘lost, stolen, or strayed,’ entitled ‘Mr. Smith, From Aberystwith,’ which it is confidently predicted will be a comedy winner for this season’s pantomimes. Already several forefront music-hall artists, including Miss Clarise Mayne, have arranged to feature this quaint waltz-time number” (“Variety Gossip,” The Stage, 10 October 1907, p. 15). Sung by Barbara Babington, Tivoli, London, and Hippodrome, Wakefield (October 1907); in the review of her act, The Era (19 October 1907, p. 9) called Mr. Smith, From Aberystwith! “a capital song.” “Plucky and charming Miss Dot Stephens, the heroine of that recent terible fall from a fast-speeding train which will yet be fresh in the memory of our readers, will on Monday next specially produce on the Stoll tour...[Castling and] Godfrey’s petite and dainty Welsh number” (The Era, 21 December 1907, p. 23).


Mister Wu (Is In The Chinese Navy Now)

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1944.

Recording: Alan Randall, on LP “Alan Randall Sings Great Comedy War Songs” (Contour 2870 402, 1974)

 

Molly McGlory

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1915.
Sung in numerous theatres by Gertie Gitana (summer 1915).

Recordings: Gertie Gitana (Regal G7209, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo?)

 

Molly OMorgan (The Irish-Italian Girl)

Fred Godfrey & Will Letters — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1909; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1936 [Library of Congress].

 

Money

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Money Isn’t Everything

Lawrence Wright as “Horatio Nicholls” & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database. A song by this title was published in 1922 by Herman Darewski Music, but Wright would have published the song through his own firm.

 

The Mother Old Ireland Gave Me

Fred Godfrey — London: Ideal Music, 1946.
Sung by Billy Stutt, Hippodrome, Belfast (October 1946).

 

Mother’s Had A Row With Father

John P. Harrington, Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Vesta Victoria — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.
Introduced by Vesta Victoria.

Recordings: Florrie Forde (Amberol 12236, 1910) [cylinder]; (Zonophone X-43222, 1910); Venie Temple (Bell Disc 462, ca. 1912, reissued on The Winner 2426, 1913?)

 

Mulligatawny (Where The Soup Comes From)

Fred Godfrey as “Dan Grahame” & Lawrence Wright as “Everett Lynton” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1927.
Sung by numerous artistes, but it was introduced by Fred Barnes at the Stratford Empire, London (March 1927); he also sang it at the Holborn Empire (June 1927), where he “has some of the most cordial applause of the evening for his excellent rendering of Mulligatawny” (The Stage, 9 June 1927, p. 11), and again in September 1927; and in other unknown theatres. Also sung by Billy Bernhart & Jimmy Young in revue Tit-Bits Of The World (April 1927); by Harry Gold’s Entertainers, Margate (June 1927); by Bruce Green, Empire Kinema, East Ham (April 1927); and by Austin Webb in revue Rainbows (June 1927).

Recordings: Fred Douglas (Regal G-8851, 1927); Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 2916, 1927); Bert Firman’s Dance Orch. (Zonophone 2922, 1927; Ariel 1064, 1927); Fred Walmsley (Regal 8875, 1927)

 

My “Are You There” Girl

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


My Bohemian Girl

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
Introduced by Nan Hearne (September 1915).


My Father Was Born In Killarney (Don’t Run Down The Irish)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — Sydney: Dinsdales’, [1911].

 

My Girl From London Town (Shes Never Seen The Swanee River)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.


My Housetop On The Trees

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


My Lass Frae Glasgae Toon

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; manuscript of lyrics, with title as My Girl Fra Glasgie Toon, in author’s collection.

 

My Little Da-Monk

Fred J. Allen, Dave Comer & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung on stage by Shaun Glenville.

Recording: Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5626, 1930)

 

My Little Dutch Doll

A.J. Mills, Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.
Sung by Cissie Cameron, Beach Pavilion, Aberdeen (August 1916), where it is described as “a fascinating song...with a catchy chorus, [and Miss Cameron finishes] with a neat execution of a Dutch clog dance” (Aberdeen Evening Express,15 August 1916, p. 5); and by Nan Stuart in revue Music At Home (August 1917).

 

My Little Girl And Me

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott, 1920.
Recording: Stanley Kirkby (Winner 3412, 1920)


My Little Red Cross Girl (I Shall Wear The Rosary That You Gave To Me)

Harry Gifford, Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

My Moonlight Girl

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.

Sung by Miss Millie Wolfgang, Hippodrome, Margate (March 1909) and in London theatres (April 1909).

 

My Old Man Will Entertain You

Fred Godfrey — 1909.
Sung by Billie Burford at the Empire, Shoreditch, the Tivoli, Manchester, and the Hippodrome, Huddersfield (March 1909), Grand, Halifax (April 1909), Hippodrome, Keighly, and Empire, Middlesborough (June 1909), and Tivoli, London (September 1909).

 

My Pal Is The Lamp Post

Fred Godfrey, Alfred Glover & Joe Slater as “Felix Le Roy” — [ca. 1910].

 

My Sweet Rosetta

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911; Harry Carlton also co-author, according to letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated Jan. 31, 1911.


My Tennessee, Is That You Calling Me?

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1918.
A big hit from just after the Armistice and sung by many artistes, especially in pantomime. Among those performing it were Victoria Carmen, Alexandra, Birmingham (December 1918); Cicely Courtneidge in pantomime, Theatre Royal, Manchester (January 1919); Dorothy Craske; Daisy Dormer in numerous theatres, including the Court, Liverpool (December 1918) and Hippodrome, Putney, London (May 1919); Tom E. Finglass in pantomime Mother Hubbard, Theatre Royal, Plymouth (December 1918, January 1919); Beatrice Hunt in pantomime Sinbad, Prince’s, Bristol (December 1918); Murray Pilcer & His Jazz Band, Maison Lyons, Oxford St., London (February 1919); and Winifred Roma.

Recordings: Courtland & Jeffries (HMV B-993, 1918); Stanley Kirkby & J. Thompson (The Winner 3242, 1918); Harry Marlow (Clarion 1024, 1919) [cylinder]; Ernest Pike, as “Herbert Payne” (Zonophone 1888, 1919); Robins & White (Scala 1041); [unidentified vocal] (Ariel 3923)

 

My Wife’s Upset Me!

Charles Collins, Fred E. Terry & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Joe Archer — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

 

My Wonderful Dad

Fred Godfrey & Fred Holt — London: Bert Feldman, 1929.

 

My Young Man Is Not A Chocolate Soldier

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; manuscript of music and lyrics (three drafts) in author’s collection.

Recordings: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 965, 1913; recorded 21 August 1912; reissued on Ariel Grand and HMV-Victor [Canadian]); (Edison Blue Amberol 23024, 1913)

 

Never, Never More

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Barclay — 1926.

Written for Vesta Victoria‘s return to the Variety stage; sung by her at the Victoria Palace, London (March 1926). .

 

No More Knocking At The Door

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

Sung by Harry Marlow at the Hippodrome, Rotherham (May 1913).


Nobody Knows How To Kiss Me

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics (three drafts) in author’s collection.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 982, 1913; recorded 21 August 1912; reissued on Ariel Grand and HMV-Victor [Canadian])

 

Nobody Loves You Like I Do (Not For A Year Or Two)

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.

 

Not A Single Girl To Kiss

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.


Now I Have To Call Him Father

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen; Detroit, New York: Jerome Remick, 1908.

 

Offer Up A Little Prayer For Mother

Fred Godfrey & Joseph G. Gilbert — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1935.


Oh, Chanticler

Fred Godfrey & ?, 1910; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 18 February 1910, in author’s collection. In 1911, Billy Williams recorded a song entitled Chanticler, attributed to [Theodore F.?] Morse — a different song?
Recording:
Billy Williams (The Twin 584, 1911; Zonophone Twin 584, 1911; Cinch 5112, 1913)

 

Oh, Daniel Douglas (Won’t Ye Come Back To Douglas?)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 24 June 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Oh, For Another Day At Margate!

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Oh For The Sight Of A Girl (Oh! Oh! Oh! For The Sight Of A Girl)

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Sung by Queenie Burnand in revue Kisses, Hippodrome, Rotherhithe, London (February 1916); by Nora Delaney [unknown theatres]; and by Eva Le Claire, Palace, Wellingborough, Northamptonshire (February 1916).

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1596, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Regal G7239, 1916)

 

Oh, Gee! Wouldn’t You Like To Be Me?

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1927.

Sung by Norman Griffin in revue Up With The Lark, which opened at the Adelphi Theatre, London, 25 August 1927. Sung by Elsie Esme in revue Hi Diddle Diddle (June 1928); and by Georges Carpentier — yes! the former champion French boxer turned Variety song-and-dance man — and Noel Cardew [unknown theatres] (February 1929).

 

Oh, Girls! Nobody Loves You Like A Nice Policeman

Fred Godfrey, Terry Sullivan & Harry Carlton — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.


Oh, How You Love! (You’re Dangerous)

words by Eric White, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1919.
Sung by Hylda Glyder.


Oh Maggie! What Have You Been Up To?

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1929.


Oh! Mary, Look What You’ve Done For Me

J. Lloyd as “James Walsh” & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.
Sung by Florrie Forde.

Recording: Fred Douglas (Regal G-9221, 1928)

 

Oh! Mister Macpherson

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.

 

Oh! Molly McIntyre (Ill Be A Scotchman For You)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


Oh! Oh! I Love You (I Can’t Keep It)

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Frank Howard, 1914.


Oh! Oh! Oh! (A Tale Of Paris) [also known as Mr. Harris — A Tale Of Paris]

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert — London: Von Tilzer Music, 1909.

 

Oh, Sailor, Behave!

words by Harry A. Steinberg [as “Dawson Street”], music by Fred Godfrey — London: Montgomery, 1931.
Recording: Albert Whelan (Imperial 2499, 1931)

 

Oh! Susanna! (How I Love That Girl)

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.


Oh! That Lovable Walk

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis & Day, 1912.


Oh, That Ragtime Waltz! (Waltzing Ragtime With You)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.

Recordings: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 1058, 1913; reissued on Rexophone [Australia], HMV-Victor [Canada], and Homophon 1229); The Two Bobs (Columbia-Rena 2164, 1913)


Oh, The Baa-Baa-Baa-Lambs! (Wagging Their Tails Behind)

Fred Godfrey & William Hargreaves — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1915.

Sung by famous male impersonator Ella Shields. Co-writer Hargreaves was Ella’s husband.


Oh! The Girls Of Gottenberg

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.

 

Oh! The Island Of Girls

Fred Godfrey, 1909; title from advertisement in The Era, 29 May 1909.
Introduced by Miss Billie Burford at the Pavilion, Newcastle.

 

Oh! The Love-Birds

Fred Godfrey, Alf J. Lawrance & Harry Gifford — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.


Oh, The Sailors Of The King

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 965, 1913; reissued on Ariel Grand 2101b, 1913; Ariel Grand 928, 1914?; and HMV-Victor [Canada] 120703, 1918)

 

Oh! Those Ever Loving, Wonderful Beautiful Eyes

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.
Sung by Miss Eddris Coombs in revue Go Ahead, Hippodrome, Devonport (February 1914), where the song is described as “a truly haunting melody...which is encored (and deservedly so) time after time” (The Era, 18 February 1914, p. 21); and by Miss May Erne and “He of the Voice” at numerous London theatres, including the Palace, Camberwell (April 1913) and the Olympia, Shoreditch (May 1913), where they “bring down the house at every performance” (The Era, 17 May 1913, p. 21).

 

Oh, Those Happy Kid Days

Fred Godfrey & R.P. Weston — London: Star Music, 1913.


Oh! You Cuddlesome Girl

A.J. Mills, Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.

Sung by Marjorie Fulton, New Theatre, Northampton (May 1916); by Hart & May in revue Some Show, Palace Playhouse, Dundee (September 1916); by Molly McCarthy at the Empire, Wolverhampton; by The Sisters Reeve, Empire, Nottingham (November 1916); by The Two Leroys, “Australian harmonising vocalists,” on tour in Wales (June 1916); by Peggy Walsh & Mollie Milne, Empire, Edinburgh (August 1916); and by Gladys Wise, Kilburn Empire (June 1916). It was still sufficiently popular a year after its introduction to be sung by Hervay Bruce & Mabel Hurst in revue Some Girls, Islington Empire, London (May 1917).   

           

Oh! You Do Do A Lot Of Funny Things, You Do

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Star Music, 1914.


Oh! You Great Big Baby Face

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman, 1913.

Sung by Nan Hearne at the Finsbury Park Empire, London (June 1913), “who is...singing...[the song] to a running accompaniment of applause as whole-hearted as it is vociferous” (The Era, 7 June 1913, p. 21). Also sung by Beattie and Babs at the Victoria, Kilburn, and other theatres, London (November 1913): “There is no more taking performance on the vaudeville stage just now than that of Beattie and Babs, who are at Wood Green this week, in Fred Godfrey and Harry Gifford’s delightful number, ‘Oh, oh, you great big baby face,’ which charming Star song brings down the house at every performance. This is without exception one of the finest novelty numbers ever exploited by these talented juvenile performers” (The Era, 12 November 1913, p. 26).


Oh! You Have No Idea

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1942.

Recording: George Formby Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3694, 1942), reissued on EP “The Ukelele Man, No. 2” (Columbia SEG-7661, 1959), reissued on LP “When I’m Cleaning Windows” (Capitol T-6002, ca. 1962); reissued on CD “Count Your Blessings” (ASV 7857, 2002); reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006) reissued on CD “The Window Cleaner” (Golden Options 3804, 2008)

 

Oh, You Italian Opera Man!

R.P. Weston, Fred J. Barnes & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1913.

 

Oh! You Paree

Jay Whidden & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.
Sung by Rosie Lloyd [in unknown theatres] (April 1921); by Vera Wooton, Hippodrome, Willesden, London [and other theatres] (May 1921)


The Old Man’s Looking In The Moon

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Old Sailor

Fred Godfrey & Jimmy Kennedy; some sources also credit Stan Bowsher — London: Peter Maurice Music; Sydney: Sterling Music, 1936.

 

On Her Pic-Pic-Piccolo

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, composed 1912 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.


On Our Happy Wedding Day (To That Little Church Just Over There)

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Sung by Fred Barnes, Holborn Empire (May 1915), Empress, London (May 1915) [and numerous other theatres]; also sung by Sadie East & Walter Lawley in revue S’Hush, Theatre Royal, Jarrow (October 1915); by Molly O’Hara & Norman Lester, Empire, Chelmsford, London (September 1915). Interpolated in revue Oh! So Dainty, Alhambra, Openshaw, Manchester (June 1915). “Ellison’s Entertainers at Brighton are making a special feature of...‘On Our Happy Wedding Day’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 22 July 1915, p. 9). “Victor King is singing...‘On Our Happy Wedding Day’ [and reports that it is one] of the most consistent ‘hits’ he has ever had” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 9 September 1915, p.189).

Recording: The Two Filberts (Jumbo 1260, 1915)


On The Banks Of The Beautiful Nile

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller, on LP “That’s Nice, Maxie” (Pye NPL-18064, 1961, reissued on Marble Arch MAL-597)

 

On The Day You Sang “Come Back To Erin”

Frank W. Carter, Alfred Glover & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

On The First Dark Night Next Week

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.
Sung by Ena Cairns, Empire, Belfast (November 1913), where “her rendition...was rapturously encored” (Belfast News-Letter, 25 November 1913, p. 7); and by Percy Haydon, King’s Theatre, Dundee (June 1914)


On The Other Side

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


On The Other Side Of The World

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1947.

Song written for George Formby Jr.’s triumphant 1947 tour of Australia and New Zealand. Formby never officially recorded the song, but private recordings exist of his singing it on tour, including one of an Auckland, N.Z., radio broadcast.

 

On The Road To Market

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


On The Road To Okalee

Fred Godfrey & J. Turner Spencer, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


One Day She Helped Herself To Father

Fred Godfrey & Fred Murray — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

Recordings: Florrie Forde (Edison 13941, 1909) [cylinder]; Venie Temple (The Winner 2210, 1912)

 

One Girl’s As Good As Any Other Girl (If That Little Girl Is Yours)

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. December 1911 for Homophon 1065 and reissues); (26 January 1912 for Zonophone Twin 787; reissued on Cinch)

 

The Only Dream I Ever Dream (Is A Dream Of You)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.
Billy Williams never recorded this song, but it was sung by Nellie Wigley in various London music halls in 1912 (“Variety Gossip,” The Stage, 10 October 1912, p. 16).


Only A Poor Little Private

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1944.

 

Open Your Heart And Let The Sunshine In

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
This big hit was sung by innumerable artistes — on disc by none bigger than Peter Dawson, and on stage by none bigger than Florrie Forde, who performed it in a number of pantomimes, including Robinson Crusoe, [unknown theatre], Blackpool (December 1920). She was later reported as saying the song “is the biggest hit she has had since ‘Down at the Old Bull and Bush’” (The Stage, 24 February 1921, p. 20). A review of her act at the Metropolitan, London (April 1921) noted: “Florrie Forde is exercising her wonderful knack of getting a chorus over the footlights, and letting it rest there, as the Americans say....[W]e lost count of the number of times the audience sang the refrain of ‘Open your heart and let the sunshine in’ on Monday evening. This very enjoyable number...has real philosophy in it, and Miss Forde gives it full expression” (The Stage, 7 April 1921, p. 11).

 

Among the many others who sang the song were Maisie Ayling, Kilburn Empire, London (January 1921); Ruth Beaumont (March 1921), who reported that “encores follow her every rendering” (The Stage, 3 March 1921, p. 16); Black & Brown (October 1920); Josie Bradley (November 1920); Connie Browning in pantomime Peter Piper, Royal Princess’s, Glasgow (December 1920); Miss Tommie Butler in pantomime Aladdin, Grand, Derby (December 1920) — “a bright and vivacious young lady who knows how to make herself popular, and she works very hard from rise to fall of the curtain. Her style and chaming manner delight her audience, and she is also gifted vocally” (Derbyshire Advertiser and Journal, 31 December 1920, p. 4); Ida Conroy in pantomime Robin Hood [place unknown] (January 1921); Eve Corner, Royal, Huddersfield (January 1921); Kitty Curtis in pantomime Cinderella, Grand, Hull (February 1921); Elsie & Nora Dale (November 1920); Elsie Doree & Jack Vincent in revue What A Night [unknown theatre] (January 1921); Kitty Evelyn in Fred Collins’ pantomime Mother Goose [unknown theatre] (January 1921); Mimi & Max Gerrard (November 1920); The Haig Bros. & Ryan (October 1920); Halliday & Staves (September 1920); Hayes & Jayes (October 1920); Robert Kent’s Uniques (February 1921); Knuts & Peaches (October 1920), who find it “a good opening number” (The Stage, 7 October 1920, p. 9); Ethel Leslie (November 1920); Harry Matto & Madge Furnival, “The Fool And The Flapper” (October 1920); Billy Quantrill (March 1921); Peggy Rose (April 1921); Belle Sylvia (May 1920); Anna Thayer in pantomime Jack And The Beanstalk, Palace, Chelsea (January 1921); The Three Star Dandies (December 1920); Emmelyn Walker in pantomime Cinderella, Theatre Royal, Edinburgh (December 1920); Dorothy Ward in Douglas, Isle of Man, in Preston, and other locales [unknown theatres] (summer 1920); Isa Wise (February 1921); and Zoe & Zona (February 1921). Interpolated in pantomime Tom, The Piper’s Son, Prince’s Theatre, Bristol (December 1920) and in pantomime Puss In Boots, Rugby (December 1920).

 

Oddly, the song appears to have been revived for the 1952–53 pantomime season, appearing in several shows in January 1953, just weeks befor Fred Godfrey’s death.

Recordings: Black Diamonds Band, in “Treasureland Selection No. 2” (Zonophone 2103, 1920); Peter Dawson as “Will Strong” (HMV B-1166, 1921)

 

Our Christmas Day

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton”, 1930.


Our Clara’s Clicked Again

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung by H. Mitchel Cregg in Billy Manders’ revue Quaintesques, Birmingham (March 1931); by Florrie Forde, Hippodrome, Sheffield (June 1930) and Derby Castle, Douglas, Isle of Man (July 1930); Henry Hearty, Southport Pavilion, Winter Gardens, Morecambe, Liverpool Pavilion, Hulme Hippodrome, Manchester (July 1930), Hippodrome, Wigan (August 1930), and Palace, Southampton (September 1930); by Ernie Lotinga in revue Ernie’s End, Kilburn Empire, London (July 1930); by Jack McDougall, Winter Gardens, Great Yarmouth (July 1930), who, it is said, introduced the song; by Hugh Rene in his Laguna Follies (July 1930); by Una Roe, Casino, Skegness (August 1930); by Clarkson Rose, Pier Casino, Shanklin, Isle of Wight (summer 1930); by the Sixteen Sun Rays, London Shoreditch (September 1930); by Randolph Sutton, Pavilion, Torquay [and other theatres] (July 1930); by Claude Worth, Winter Gardens, Rothesay (July 1930); by Fred Wynne, Westcliffe Pavilion and the Oval, Margate (September 1930). Other artists who sang it [in theatres unknown] were Mamie Holland, Sam Mayo, Billy Thomas, and Jack Barty.

Recording: Clarkson Rose (Zonophone 5671, 1930)

 

Our Little Kiddie Sings The Best Song Of All

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Frank Howard, 1914.

 

Our Neighbours

Fred Godfrey & Clarkson Rose, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Our Village (I Do Have A Lovely Time)

Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.

 

Ours Is A Happy Little Home

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Out In The Middle East

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1942.

Recordings: George Formby Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3624, 1942), reissued on LP “Britain At War” (EMI EM-1366, 1990); ; reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006); George Formby Jr., recording for ENSA radio program “The RAF Takes The Air”, with the RAF Concert Orchestra, 22 July 1942, issued on CD “Formby At War” (Grosvenor CDGRS 1224, ca. 1992); George Formby Jr., in ABC-TV (U.K.) show “Many Happy Returns”, aired 15 February 1958; Alan Randall, on LP “Alan Randall Sings Great Comedy War Songs” (Contour 2870 402, 1974)

 

Over The Hills And Far Away (A Dutch Girl’s Lament)[EMI lists title as Over The Mountains Far Away)]

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.
Described in Francis & Day newspaper advertisements as “Alice Lloyd’s American Chorus Hit” (see, for example, The Era, 8 August 1908, p. 31).


Paddy McCarty’s Party

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


P.C. McWheeler

Fred Godfrey, [1912?].

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Jumbo 853, 1912)

 

The Penny Wedding

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; ; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 March 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

 

The Perambulator Promenade

Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.
Recording: Mark Sheridan (Jumbo 958, 1913)           

 

Picking Up All The Fag Ends

Fred Godfrey & Max Miller, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Pierrot Parade

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1916.

Sung by Nora Delaney in Huddlestone & Tiller revue Well! I Never Did, Winter Garden, Blackpool (July 1916) — “Miss Nora Delaney has made a tremendous hit on this, her first appearance in Blackpool. Her rendering of ‘Pierrot parade’ was beyond praise, and Mr. Tiller’s elaborate production and gorgeous dressing for this song are items that will live long in the memories of all who see the show” (The Era, 5 July 1916, p. 22); “[In Pierrot Parade, Delaney] is assisted by a chorus of about a hundred futurist pierrots in weirdly beautiful costumes of ingeniously original design” (The Era, 12 July 1916, p. 9). Also sung by Phyllis Darsley in revue Some Girls, Tivoli, Manchester (August 1916); by Josie Delaine [Gallimore], Palace, Chelsea (June 1917); and by Gwennie Morgan in revue Midnight Revels, Hippodrome, Darlington (March 1917).

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1679, 1916)

 

The Policeman’s Party

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

The Poor Girl Cried, And Cried, And Cried

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1937.
Sung by Stella Peters in Pete Davis’s Fun Furore, Hippodrome, Chesterfield (April 1937). Also performed, according to the sheet music cover, by the BBC Dance Orchestra, directed by Henry Hall.


Poor Old Father

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
Sung by Dollie Barrie in The Jovial Jollies, New Theatre, Crew (July 1920); by Hal Bryan in pantomime Humpty-Dumpty And The Three Wishes, Royal Glasgow (December 1928); by Rose Cambry (April 1920); by Ada Fawn, Hippodrome, Belfast (August 1920); by Jack Gillam (June, November 1920); by Fred Johnson in revue The Seven Joy Bells, Pavilion, Bexhill (May 1922); by Kiddy Kennedy (November 1920); by Lillie Langtry — no, not “the” Lillie Langtry (May 1920); by Susie Marney, Palace, Hull (April 1920); by Ernie Mayne, Holborn Empire, London (September 1927) and Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London (November 1927); by Godfrey R. Reed (March 1921); by Mabel Thorne in revue What’s Next? (April 1920); by Rosie Tunbridge (February 1921). Interpolated in pantomime Sinbad The Sailor, Gaiety, Dublin (December 1920).

 

Prairie Romeo

Harry Carlton & Fred Godfrey — London: Irwin Dash Music, 1937.

Recordings: BBC Dance Orchestra; dir. by Henry Hall; Bob Mallin, vocal (Columbia FB-1708, 1937); Bob Mallin (Rex 9081, 1937)

 

Pretty Little Sansy Pansy Soo

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Pretty Patty’s Proud Of Her Pink Print Petticoat

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
A tongue-twister number sung by Miss Fay Desmond, Beach Pavilion, Aberdeen (July 1916).

 

The Pride Of The Ballet

Fred Godfrey — Detroit; New York: Jerome Remick, 1908.
Sung by Vesta Victoria.


Pull Yourselves Together, Girls!

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Florrie Forde — London; New York: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.
Sung by Florrie Forde, Derby Castle, Douglas, Isle of Man (July 1909), Palace, Blackburn (October 1909), Palace and Hippodrome, Burnley (November 1909), King’s Theatre, Edinburgh (November 1909), and Palace, Bradford (December 1909). A Burnley newspaper reported: “All music hall patrons know Florrie Forde, the comedienne who is probably the greatest chorus singer on the stage at present, and it is, therefore, only uttering a commonplace to say that she proved as popular as ever, and that her songs went with a jolly good swing. On this occasion she had a repertoire of new songs....and all caught on immensely with the large audiences of Monday night. She delighted them at the outset with ‘Pull yourselves together, girls’” (Burnley Express, 10 November 1909, p. 2).
Recordings: Florrie Forde (Zonophone X-43197, 1909; Amberol 12122, 1909 [cy;inder])

 

Put A Bit Of Powder On It, Father

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1908.

 

Put On Your Kilt, Sandy

Fred Godfrey & Fred D’Albert, [1910?].

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Jumbo 480, 1910)

 

Put On Your Little Wooden Shoes

Fred Godfrey & Tom Mellor — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

 

Put On Your Old Plaid Shawl

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1909.
Sung by Lottie Cora in pantomime Dick Whittington (1909); by Lottie Lennox, Royal Hippodrome, Belfast (January 1910), Tivoli, Barrow-in-Furness (April 1910), Hippodrome, Darlington (June 1910), and Hackney Empire (July 1910); and by Miss Mena Brae. Also sung by Irene Beaumont and Jessie Lee, according to the Australian sheet music cover (an Australian duo?).

 

The Queen Of The Factory

Fred Godfrey & J.F. Lambe — London: Price & Reynolds, 1909.
Sung by Florrie Forde. The lyrics of the chorus were published in The Era, 6 November 1909: “She’s the queen of the factory / You’ll see her there every morning, / Off she goes in her working clothes,/Looks as sweet as a summer rose. / She may not be a lady, born of high degree / In her little plaid shawl she’s the best of them all / — The queen of the factory.”.

 

Ragtime

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript of music in author’s collection — same song as Good-Bye, Rag-Time?


The Ragtime Scotchman

Fred Godfrey, [1913?].

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Jumbo 1054, 1913)

 

The Ragtime Wedding

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913.

 

Rainbowland

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.
Sung by Maie Ash.

 

Raining (Drops Of Love For You And Me)

Tom Mellor & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.


Razzy Wazzy Lou

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1915.

Interpolated in revue Hullo! Everybody (September 1915). “The second edition of Step This Way is making its first appearance before London audiences at the Middlesex this week. This successful revue has been considerable altered since it was last seen in town, and one of the most interesting newcomers to the cast is Gaby Davia,...who is billed and known as ‘Razzy Wazzy Lou,’ after the song of the same name—with which she has made a striking success everywhere” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 27 May 1915, p. 22). Also sung by Jennie Hackett in pantomime Cinderella, Grand Opera House, Belfast (January 1917); and by Esta Stella.

Recordings: Hayes & Croft (Coliseum 880, 1915); The Two Filberts (Jumbo 36067, 1915?)

 

Red Wing

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1907.
Sung by Ouida Macdermott at the Lyceum Theatre, London [though this might be another song by the same title by Thurland Chattaway and Kerry Mills].

 

The Regimental Pet (Drummer Boy)

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1907.

 

Rhythm Is The Thing

Lawrence Wright as “Everett Lynton”, Johnny Raitz, Fred Godfrey & Arthur Young — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1927.
Sung by Miss Derra de Moroda in revue Yes, Yes, Princess, Hammersmith Palace (June 1927) — “Her dark beauty is well suited to the part of the scheming foreign princess, but it is in her dancing above all that that clever Miss de Moroda scores. He song and dance number, ‘Rhythm is the thing,’ can be reckoned one of the musical high-spots of the show” (The Era, 22 June 1927, p. 4); by Jennie Hartley in revue Mustard Club, Brixton (March 1927); by Ettie Howard (April 1927); by Marjorie Lotinga in revue Sensations of 1927, Onchan Pavilion, Douglas, Isle of Man (July 1927); by Leslie Rome & Connie Leonard, London, Shoreditch (April 1927). Interpolated in revue Us (March 1927); in revue Charleston Follies, Pier Pavilion, Worthing (July 1927). “Medley Barrett, Britsih representative of the International Dancing Federation, attended the world’s dancing championships in Paris. The Lawrence Wright Music Co. were well represented, and the [Charleston test piece was] ‘Rhythm is the Thing’” (The Stage, 2 June 1927, p. 4).

 

Ride To Church On A Gee-Gee!

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

 

Ring Me Up One Rainy Afternoon

Fred Godfrey, 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


Ring Out, Joy Bells!

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1913.
Sung by Harrington & Hemley in revue Chase Me, Islington Empire (March 1914).

 

Rio Grande

Fred Godfrey & Jay Whidden — London: Bert Feldman; Sydney: Chappell, 1921.
Sung by Australian soprano Lucille Benstead, who sung it in various theatres (spring–summer 1921); by Babs Pacy, Durban, South Africa (September 1921); by Betty Perks & Tony Glenville (October 1921); and by Jennie Robins (September 1921).

 

Rio Grande

Fred Godfrey; EMI credits Lawrence Wright as “Gene Williams” & Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1934.

                                                       

Rolling Home In The Morning (After The Ball)

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Sydney: Chappell, 1923.
Sung by Fred Collier (October 1923); by Florrie Forde, Douglas, Isle of Man (May–July 1923); by Alice Maude in revue Marguerite, Palace Theatre and Hippodrome, Burnley (June 1924); by Joe & Dave O’Gorman in numerous theatres (1923–24), including the Camberwell Palace and the Coliseum, London (February 1924) and the Victoria Palace (September 1924); by Ella Shields in numerous theatres (1923–24), including the Stratford Empire, London (August 1923) — “Fred Godfrey is evidently coming back to something like his old form....[H]e has now produced another winner in ‘Rolling Home in the Morning.’ This one has been taken up by Ella Shields, who is most enthusiastic over her new ‘find’” (The Era, 16 May 1923, p. 24), and “Miss Shields makes no secret of the fact that this number is just what she has been looking for for some time” (The Stage, 17 May 1923, p. 3). Also sung by comedian Reg Wentworth (June 1923) and in pantomime Red Riding Hood, East Ham Palace (January 1924). Interpolated in revue Marguerite, Opera House, Londonderry (February 1925).

 

Rolling Into France

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1944.
Written for George’s ENSA tour of France, August 1944.


Rosalie

Bennett Scott, A.J. Mills & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, [date unknown, but not later than 1919, year of Mills’s death].

 

The Rose Of Alabam

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.
Sung by various artistes, including Connie Browning, Pavilion, Liverpool (July 1920); Tom E. Finglass, Empire, Belfast (April 1920); Millie Jillson in pantomime Puss In Boots, Theatre Royal, Windsor (January 1921) and at the Empire, Chatham (February 1921); and Alec Regan, Empire, Birmngham (November 1920) and Palace, Leicester (December 1920)..

 

Rose Of Rickety Rackety Row

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.

 

The Rose Of Rosetown

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, [ca. 1912]; manuscript of lyrics (two drafts) in author’s collection.

 

Rosebud

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

Roses Red And Roses White

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by Maud Hughes.

 

Rosy...Whoa! The Crackling On The Pork!

Fred Godfrey & Orlando Powell — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.


Runner Beans That Father Grew

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

The Sailors Love The Girls

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1936.
Sung by Peggy Caird in pantomime Robinson Crusoe, Princess’s, Yeovil (December 1936); by The Eight Academy Girls, Metropolitan, London (July 1936); by Florrie Forde; by Vann & Kent, Britannia Pier, Great Yarmouth (August 1936), Hippodrome, Ilford (October 1936), and Rex, Leytonstone, London (November 1936). Also performed [by unknown artist] at the Royal, Bristol (May 1936), and interpolated in pantomime Robinson Crusoe, New Hippodrome, Manchester (December 1936).

 

Sally OMalley

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1910; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


Sandy Macadoo

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 2 May 1912 and 24 June 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.


Save A Little One For Me

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1909.


Save Your Kisses Till The Boys Come Home

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; New York: Jerome Remick, 1915.
Sung by Miss Lily Beven’s chorus & ballet in pantomime Sinbad The Sailor, Palace, Aberdeen (March 1916); and by eleven-year-old Eileen Shand, daughter of comedian Ernest Shand, Finsbury Park (May 1916).

Recordings: Robins & White (Scala 932, 1915); The Two Filberts (Jumbo 36747, 1915?); Robert Carr (The Winner 3030, 1916); Hayes & Croft (Coliseum 999, 1916); The Jolly Old Fellows, in “Dug-Out Ditties, Part 4” (Regal MR-193, 1930)

 

Send The Boys A Little Snapshot (Of The Ones They’ve Left Behind)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

 

Send Us A Few More Girls

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
One of a number of Godfrey songs that was borrowed to comment on the events of the day: “About a thousand female strikers attacked the police station at Hyères [France] the other day, smashing the windows, breaking in the doors, and assaulting the policemen with sticks. ‘Hyères, I say! Less of it! was the comment of the Constabulary. The Mayor, poor chap, had a shocking time, and finally had to get on to the roof, and pull the house up after him, before he could feel really safe. There is a certain song popular this year which runs, ‘Send us a few more girls. The Mayor and police of Hyères never sing it now” (“By the Way,” Globe and Traveller, 27 December 1907, p. 1). And about the women’s suffrage movement: “Whatever popular songs member of Parliament may feel inclined to croon, by way of lightening the tedium of dull debates, the well-known lyric, ‘Send us a few more girls,’ is not likely to be one of them” (“By the Way,” Globe and Traveller, 16 October 1908, p. 1).
Sung by Lily Burnand, Empire, Brixton (November 1907); and by Arthur Reece.

 

Sergeant Macadoo (A Little Bit Of French And A Little Bit Of Scotch)

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott, 1915.

“Daisy Taylor returned to London this week, appearing at the Palladium, where she is singing ‘Sergeant Macadoo’, a number with which she has made a success in the provinces” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 29 April 1915, p. 21). “Daisy Taylor is proving herself a big favourite at the Place, Leicester, her fine rendering of the Scottish number, ‘Sergeant Macadoo’, making a strong appeal to audiences” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 27 May 1915, p. 22). Miss Taylor also sung it at the Grand, Clapham (October 1915). Also sung by Nellie Boden, Middlesex Theatre, London (April 1916); by Retta Halkett in pantomime Jack And Jill, Hippodrome, Greenock (December 1915); by Cora Lingard in revue Search Me!, Collins’s, London (January 1916); and by The Tiller Girls in pantomime Babes In the Wood, Theatre Royal, Glasgow (December 1915)

Recordings: Ella Retford (Jumbo A-513, 1915?); Murray Johnson (HMV B-554, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo ?); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2862, 1915); Arthur Osmond (Coliseum 778, 1915)

 

She Does Like A Little Bit Of Scotch

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912.

 

She Is My Best Girl Now

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913.


She Is The Leader Of The Band

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams?, [ca. 1912]; title from Williams & Godfrey stationery in author’s collection.


She Said She Wouldn’t — But She Did!

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.
Sung by Billy Caryll in revue Ups-A-Daisy (March 1929); interpolated in revue Ha, Ha, Ha!, Liverpool Pavilion (April 1929).


She Shall Have Music Wherever She Goes

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller, in “Max At The Holborn Empire — First House” (7 October 1938), issued on 2-cassette set “Max Miller: The Cheeky Chappie” (EMI ECC10, 1990)

 

She Was, She Was, She Was

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society. One of several songs Godfrey is thought to have written for Max Miller around 1937–38, but for which he is not credited.

Recording: Max Miller (HMV BD-597, 1938) [with credit to Miller]

 

She Was Singing An Old Fashioned Song

Fred Godfrey & J. Turner Spencer, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Sheila O’Neil

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 27 September 1912.

Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 1041, 1913; reissued on Ariel Grand and HMV-Victor [Canada] 120707, 1918)

 

She’s A Girl Up North

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert — London: Bert Feldman; New York: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.
Recordings:
Ella Retford (Edison Blue Amberol 12072, 1909) [cylinder]; (Jumbo 386, 1909; Pathé 8205, 1910); Harry Fay (Columbia-Rena 1255, 1910)

 

Shes Coming Home Tonight

Charles Hilbury, Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1910.


Shine, Little Moonflower

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1908.


Silly Thing

Francis, Day & Hunter sheet music credits Larry Lewis, Fred Godfrey & Fred Murray; Dinsdale’s sheet music credits Fred Godfrey, Fred Murray & Charles Hilbury — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1913.
Sung by Larry Lewis.


Since Father’s Been A Gardener

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 March 1912 and 4 April 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Since Father Joined The Territorials

EMI database credits Will Hyde & Fred Godfrey; other sources credit Will Hyde, ? Heath & Billy Williams, 1909.

 

Sing A Gay Little Song Today

Fred Godfrey, Elsie Waters & Doris Waters, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Sing A Little Song In The Morning

Fred Godfrey & Max Miller, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Sing Me An Irish Song

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey; Harry Carlton also co-author, according to Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911 — London; New York: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911.


Sing Something Irish To Me

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1911.
Sung by Irene Beaumont.

 

Sitting In A Field

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].


Sitting In The Park

Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Skin-A-Ma-Link The Sergeant

Fred Godfrey — London: Campbell, Connelly, 1931.


The Skipper Of The Side

Clarkson Rose & Fred Godfrey [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Sleepless Nights

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.


Soap And Water

Fred Godfrey & Charles Hilbury — Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1909.

 

Soldiers Like It

Fred Godfrey & Shaun Glenville — London: Bert Feldman, 1918.
Sung by Jennie Reeve in revue Sailors Don’t Care, Royal Hippodrome, Dover (February 1919); by Lille Soutter in pantomime The Babes In The Wood, Thaetre Royal, Nottingham (January 1919).
Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1906, 1918)


Some Day, Some Place, Somewhere

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams?, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 22 March 1913; it is also listed on Williams & Godfrey stationery — same song as Someday!?


Some Little Girl Named Mary (Mary Was My Mother’s Name)

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Introduced by Lottie Lennox.

Recording: F.W. Ramsey (Regal G-6889)


Some Night, Some Waltz, Some Girl

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1916; Toronto: Leo Feist, [1927?].

 

Somebody Wants Me

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

Somebody’s Found A Girl (Hooray! Hooray! Hooray!)

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat [Library of Congress] — London: Bert Feldman, 1907.


Someday! [also known as Sometime, Somewhere, Someday]

Harry Gifford, Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Star Music; Lawrence Wright Music; Melbourne: Allan & Co., 1913; same song as Some Day, Some Place, Somewhere?

Recordings: Ernest Pike as “Herbert Payne” (Zonophone Twin 1204, 1913); Emilie Hayes (Marathon 296) [vertical cut disc]

 

Somewhere In Sometown

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Maurice Scott — London: Star Music, 1914.

Sung by Aimee Sammons in the Lillie Calden and Harry Ray revue Find The Lady, Edmonton Empire (May 1914).

 

The Song-Birds’ Concert In The Trees

Jay Whidden & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.

 

Sonny Boy

Fred Godfrey as “Eddie Stamper” & Matthew Hay, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

Sorry! Oh! It’s Quaite All Right

Fred Godfrey — London: Worton David, 1924.
Sung by Dollie & Billie, Alhambra, London (September 1924); by Daisy Dormer (October 1924); by Violet Victoria, Trocadero, Blackpool (October 1924); by Edie Watson in revue Follow The Money, numerous theatres (January-February 1925); by Muriel White in BBC radio broadcast (9 December 1925); also sung [by unknown artiste] in broadcasting revue Radio Radiance [with Tommy Handley et al.] (September 1925).

       

Sorry (You’ll Be Sorry, Florrie)

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1923.
Sung by Florrie Forde and by Ella Retford..

 

The Soul Of The Violets

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Lawrence Wright as “Horatio Nicholls”— London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1931.
Sung by Sylvia Cecil in Lawrence Wright revue On With The Show, North Pier, Blackpool (1931) — “Miss Sylvia Cecil has been acclaimed by Mr. Hannen Swaffer as one of the leading sopranos of the future and in...‘Soul of the Violets’...she justifies that assertion” (The Era, 27 May 1931, p. 23).

Recording: Zonophone Salon Orch. (Zonophone 5979, 1931)

 

Spain, My Sunny Spain

Tom Mellor & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

 

Spring-Time Might Have Been Ring-Time

John P. Long, A.J. Mills & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1915.

 

Squeeze Her, Ebenezer

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.
Recording: Billy Williams (Zonophone Twin 1012, 1913; reissued on Ariel Grand 2104 and 592, 1913; and on HMV-Victor [Canada] 120705, 1918)

 

Stick To The Major

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 March 1912 and 4 April 1912.

 

Stop It, John

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Chappell, 1920.
A big hit for Hilda Glyder, who sang it in many theatres, including the Grand, Clapham, Willesden Hippodrome, Kilburn Empire, and Ilford Hippodrome, London (March 1920), Empire, Liverpool, and Stratford Empire, London (April 1920), Empire, Sunderland, and Hammersmith Palace, London (June 1920), Hippodrome, Portsmouth (July 1920), and Palladium, London (September 1920). Also sung by Gladys Behenna (June 1920); by Ruth Beaumont (June 1920); by Meg Hamilton in pantomime Jack And Jill, Grand, Croydon (December 1920); by Jennie Hartley; by ShirleyWhite, Collins’s and Empire, Croydon (December 1920), and by Witt & Steven, Empire, Cardiff, and Empire, Leeds (September 1920), Empire, Gateshead (October 1920).

 

Stop Making Those Eyes At Me

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by Hilda Glyder, Holborn Empire and Camberwell Palace, London (February 1919).

 

Stop Me If You’ve Heard It

Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Stop Your Nonsense, Archibald!

A.J. Mills & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1914.

Sung by Winifred Ward, “who...at the Coliseum, Glasgow, has a ‘winner’ in ‘Stop Your Nonsense, Archibald’ (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 12 November 1914, p. 20); also sung by Daisy Wood...

 

A Stranger In My Own Home Town

Fred Godfrey & Francis Halson — London: Bert Feldman, 1937.
Sung by Tom Deere in revue Fools And Angels, Hippodrome, Dover (May 1937); and by The Original Hillbillies.


Strolling Along The Sands

Fred Godfrey & Kenneth Lyle — London: Shapiro, Von Tilzer Music, 1907.

 

Strolling Down The Strand

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony — London: Vocable Music, 1949; London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1950.

Sung by Tommy Trinder in pantomime Puss In Boots, Palladium, London (December 1949); and by Stephen Lang on BBC radio broadcast (July 1950).

Recordings: Billy Cotton Tommy Trinder, on LP “You Lucky People” (Silverline DJSL-037, 1974); Leslie Sarony, on LP “Roy Hudd Presents Leslie Sarony” (World Records RTRS- 101, 1980)

 

Sunbeam

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.


Sunday Night At Home

Geoff Bernstein & Fred Godfrey — London: Sydney Brau Music, [date unknown].

 

Sunshine Soo [also known as Under The Mimosa Tree]

Fred Godfrey & A.E. Sidney Davis — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.
Sung by Miss Bessie Butt, Empire, Hackney, London (May 1908), in pantomime Cinderella, Royal County Thetare, Kingston (January 1909), where “Miss Butt has carried all before her, and her exceedingly pretty song, ‘Sunshine Soo,’ is likley to haunt the neighbourhood for many weeks to come” (The Era, 2 January 1909, p. 20), and at the Granville, Waltham Green (May 1909).

Recording: Brett Barry (Pathé 8792)

 

The Sweetest Kiss Of All (Under The Mistletoe)

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Jessie Preston — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911.
Sung by Queenie Leighton and by Jessie Preston.

 

Swinging Along

Fred Godfrey as “Eddie Stamper” & Matthew Hay — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1926.
Sung by Layton & Johnstone, Alhambra, London (December 1926); and by Donald Mather (December 1926).

 

Take It Away
Fred Godfrey & Charles Hibury — Sydney: Joe Slater Publishing, [ca. 1910].

 

Take It Nice And Easy

Harry Castling, John A. Glover-Kind & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.
Sung by Charles R. Whittle (June 1910) and, in something of a revival, by Marie Beresford, Palace, Derby (January 1914).

 

Take Me Back To Dear Old Blighty

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman; Star Music; New York; Toronto: Chappell; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1916.

 

Take Me Back To New York [Town?]

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey, [1909?].

References to this obscure song are few, and it is not certain this is about the same song, but in 1909 a newspaper commented: “Hint for Hosts—At Mr. Reginald Vanderbilt’s fancy dress ball at Newport, we read, one of the guests appeared during the evening as an organ-grinder playing ‘Take Me Back to New York Town.’ Do not drive your guests to this, if you want to be a really successful host” (“By the Way,” Globe and Traveller, 31 August 1909, p. 1).


Take Me Back To U.S.A.

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.


Take Me Back To Yorkshire

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Bert Feldman, 1910; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1937 [Library of Congress].

Sung by Ivy Gallard in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Queen’s Park Hippodrome, Manchester (December 1910); by Susie Marney, Grand, Derby (August 1912); and by Winnie Usher, Grand. Luton (January 1912). Interpolated in the Academy Award–winning film Cavalcade (1933)

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 797, 1911)

 

Take Me Back To Your Heart
Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

“The writers...have a following of staunch admirers who had sufficient faith in their work to put the song on immediately without waiting to see how it turned out with some other singer” (The Stage, 20 May 1915, p. 23). Popular ballad sung by numerous artistes, including Marie Brayman in pantomime Little Miss Muffet, Theatre Royal, Nottingham (February 1916); Dora Christian, Pleasure Gardens, Folkestone (June 1915); Belgian soprano Clo d‘Arta, Metropole, Manchester (September 1915); Evelyn Grace, Winter Garden, Blackpool (May 1915); Dorothy Ward, Empire, Edinburgh (April 1915); Leslie Ward (June 1915); and Nellie Wigley (June 1915).

Recordings: Harry Edwards (Pathé 9074, 1915?); Randall Jackson (Jumbo ?); Herbert Payne (Zonophone Twin 1466, 1915)

 

Take Me There

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Will Letters [Library of Congress]; American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) credits Godfrey & J.C. Moore — London: Bert Feldman, 1910; London; New York: M. Whitmark & Sons, 1911.

Note: Society of Composers, Authors and Music Publishers of Canada (SOCAN) apportions royalty shares as follows: Godfrey (25.0%), Will Letters (25.0%), Warner Brothers (50.0%)

           

Take Me Up In The Mountains Sammy

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
Sung by Ruby Norton (1908).

 

Take Me Where There Are No Eyes About

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911.


Take Me With You

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

Take My Rose, Take My Heart

Fred Godfrey, date unknown; there is a 1918 song of this title published by Star Music, but with credits to Doreen Grey.

 

Take Your Greedy Eyes Off My Little Girl

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.
Introduced by Daisy Dormer; also sung by Nora Stockelle, Bedford Theatre, London (December 1907)..

 

Taking Your Best Girl Out

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman, 1913.


Teeny Weeny Bit Of Love

Fred Godfrey — London: Mac Melodies, [1930s?].

 

Tell Them You’re A Londoner

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911.


Tennessee Twilight

Fred Godfrey [most sources; Performing Right Society also credits George Arthurs] — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Performed by Folies Bergères dancer Terpsichore & pianist Simon Wery (1930).

 

Thank You For The Very Kind Suggestion

Fred Godfrey & John L. St. John, [date unknown]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.


That Beautiful Baby Song

Hubert W. David, Raphael Penso & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

That’s All

Fred Godfrey, ? Gray & ? Low, [1916?].

Recording: Arthur Gilbert as “Arthur Osmond (Jumbo 1469, 1916)

 

That’s How Ireland Was Born

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1946.
Sung by Danny Malone.

 

That’s Just William

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


Then He’d Waltz Her Around

Worton David, Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1915)

 

There Are Nice Girls Everywhere

Fred Godfrey, according to the Performing Right Society, and claimed by Godfrey; Francis & Day and British Library credit R.P. Weston; “John Bull Record” label erroneously credits Whit Cunliffe — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.


There Are Smiles Behind The Tears

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.
Sung by Mabel Costello (August 1920).

 

There Is Always A Silver Lining

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1939.
Sung by Marjorie Clayton in pantomime Humpty Dumpty, Leicester Opera House (December 1939); by Enid Lowe in pantomime Mother Goose, Royal, Nottingham (December 1939); by Eileen O’Mahoney in pantomime Jack And The Beanstalk, Wood Green Empire, London (December 1939); also sung by Dorothy Ward.,

 

There Must Be Something Nice About The Isle Of Man

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913.

 

There Never Was A Girl Like You

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey [some sources have Alf Lawrance instead of Godfrey] — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.
Sung by Marie Beresford, Pavilion, Northwich, Cheshire (June 1909); and by Helene Mohr, Willesden and Grand. Clapham, London (June 1909).


There’ll Be Nothing But Boys In Khaki By The Seaside

Raphael Penso, Lawrence Wright & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Sung by Bert Castle, Palace, Blackpool (June 1915); by Nora Delaney; by Vera Dudley in revue Come And Have One (October 1915) — “[A]mong the many song items in the revue Come And Have One, none attracts more applause than Vera Dudley’s ‘There’ll Be Nothing But Boys In Khaki By The Seaside’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 7 October 1915, p. 18).

Recordings: Harry Cove (The Winner 2867); Alf Gordon (HMV-Victor [Canada] 120323); Will Terry (Jumbo 35904)

 

There’ll Come A Day

Fred Godfrey, date unknown; title from EMI database.

 

There’s A Big Tear On My Heart

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.
Sung by Isa Wise.


There’s A Girl In Berlin

Fred Godfrey, Fred E. D’Albert & J. Chas. Moore — London: National Music; Melbourne: Allan & Co.; New York: Maurice Shapiro, 1909.
A hit for Victoria Monks, who sang it in numerous theatres, including the Tivoli and the Canterbury, London (October–November 1909) and the Hackney Empire, London (January 1910). A report in The Era (1 January 1910,
p. 28) notes that the song had been used in more than thirty pantomimes that season; one was Mother Goose, at the Grand, Glasgow (December 1909), in which it was sung by Lily Morris.

 

There’s A Little Baby Up In The Moon

Fred Godfrey and Lawrence Wright; Performing Right Society also credits Worton David — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Sung by G.H. Elliott in numerous theatres, including the Empire, Edinburgh (July 1915), Empire, Leeds (September 1915), Coliseum, London (October 1915) and Hippodrome, Rochdale (February 1916). Also sung by Cressie Leonard in the Huddlestone & Tiller revue Did You Ever? (Winter Garden, Blackpool, 1915); and by Pauline Rivers, Tower, Blackpool (July 1915). Yet another Godfrey song taken up, perhaps rather improbably, by Tommies marching off to war, as this excerpt from the leaving of the 3/3 West Riding (Yorkshire) Field Ambulance attests:

Reveille at 6 a.m., a hurried breakfast, the roll call by the aid of a storm lantern, a terse soldierly speech by Lieut. Woolley...and the medicos fall in with other units who are sending men to their brothers oversea. In stentorian tones the order is given...and in the grey dawn of a raw January morning the long column debouches on to the road....The whole repertoire of camp songs comes out lustily, interspersed with jest and quip. The cottager, who comes sleepily to his cottage door to watch the troops march, might say to himself that here is a band of soldiers on holiday bent—these men surely are not going in this light-hearted manner to face the hardships and dangers of a perilous campaign. The trained observer alone might know by the more powerful rendering of the choruses and the heartier laughter of a certain mental tension beneath. Away to the East the light breaks and day appears. A halt is called...and “There’s a little baby up in the moon” [and other songs] rouse the countryside for miles around. (“From Clipstone to France,” Mansfield Reporter, 28 January 1915, p. 5)

Recordings: George Baker as “George Guest” (Jumbo 36094); G.H. Elliott (Zonophone Twin 1468, 1915); Irving Kaufman (Edison Blue Amberol 2997, 1916) [cylinder]


There’s A Little Bit Here, There’s A Little Bit There (There’s A Little Bit Everywhere)

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 4 April 1912; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

There’s A Little Bit Of Irish Everywhere

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.

Recording: Charlie Collins (Zonophone Twin 1739, 1916)

 

There’s A Little Fairy Looking After You

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics (two drafts) in author’s collection.

 

There’s A Sound Of Music In The Air

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 24 June 1912.

 

There’s Always Someone Worse Off Than You

Max Miller & Fred Godfrey — London: Noel Gay Music, [ca. 1938].

Recording: Max Miller (Pye 7-N-15349, 1961, reissued on LP “Golden Hour Of Max Miller” (Pye GH-584)

 

Theres Life In The Old Dog Yet

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1914.

 

There’s Something In The Irish After All

Leslie Leonard Cooke, Shaun Glenville & Fred Godfrey, 1915.
Sung by Shaun Glenville, Royal Hippodrome, Belfast (May 1915) — “Shaun Glenville, ‘Ireland’s Own,’ was another huge favourite, and proved himself a most versatile artist, his amusing songs, rendered in inimitable style, being capped with a rare flow of patter. His concluding number, a patriotic topical song-scena anent Ireland and the war—‘There’s Something In The Irish After All’—had an irrestible military touch and fairly ‘brought down the house’” (Belfast News-Letter, 4 May 1915, p. 3).

 

Theres Something Nice About A Girl

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911.

 

These Are The Good Old Days

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

They All Did The Goose-Step Home

A.J. Mills, Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1915.

It was still possible to mock the Hun at this stage of the Great War, and the song found favour in theatres and pantos all over Britain. Sung by Winifred Ward in numerous theatres, including the Palace, Hull (May 1915) — “Winifred Ward...has found a number that suits her admirably in ‘They All Did The Goose-Step Home’. At the Palace, Hull, this week, the lively spirited chorus is having a most rousing effect on audiences” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 6 May 1915, p. 11); she also sung it at the Euston and South London theatres (September 1915) and in pantomime at the Marlborough, London (December 1915). Also sung by Fred Barnes; by Marie Brayman in pantomime Little Miss Muffet, Theatre Royal, Nottingham (January 1916); by Edgar Curtis’s singing marionettes, Empire, Bedford (June 1916); by Des Desborough in pantomime, Theatre Royal, Worthing (December 1915); by The Eight Sun Stars in pantomime, Theatre Royal, Birkenhead (December 1915); by May Harper in pantomime Aladdin, Grand, Plymouth (January 1916); by Ethel Holden in pantomime, Tottenham, London (December 1915); by Dorothy Irving, Coliseum, Derby (February 1916); by Rosalie Jacobi in pantomime, Rotunda, Liverpool (December 1915); by Lillie Langtry [not “the” Lillie Langtry] in pantomime, Islington Empire (December 1915); by George Lawrence, Circus, Bury (September 1915); by Katie Marsh in pantomime Forty Thieves, Brixton, London (December 1915), and in revue Somebody’s Looking, Revue Theatre, Kingston (April 1916); by May Mayo in pantomime, Grand, Nottingham (December 1915); by Una Reynolds in pantomime, Royal Palace, Ramsgate (December 1915); by Randolph Sutton, Palace, Bradford (October 1915); by Vera Tymes in pantomime, Pavilion, Hoylake (December 1915); by Gladys Warren in pantomime, [Winter Garden?], Devonshire Park, Eastbourne (December 1915); by Reg Wentworth, Alhambra, Glasgow (September 1915); and by Walter Williams in revue Merry Moments, London (September 1915) — “In working the number he is assisted by ten of the chorus ladies, with the result that a very effective stage picture is secured” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 23 September 1915, p. 21). Also interpolated in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Theatre Royal, Glasgow (December 1915).

Recordings: Black Diamonds Band, in “All The Hits” (Zonophone Twin 1571, 1915); Gus Harris (Regal 6909); Irving Kaufman (Edison Blue Amberol 2741) [cylinder]

 

They All Look Alike In The Dark

A.J. Mills, Maurice Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1918.

Sung by Louis Bradfield in pantomime Cinderella, Theatre Royal, Manchester (December 1918). [Note: The following are for a song published by Bert Feldman; not the Godfrey song?] Sung by Kitty Curtis in pantomime Cinderella, Kennington Theatre (January 1923). Interpolated in Fred Karno’s revue Scarlet Runners, Swindon (August 1922) and sung by Leslie Rome in the Karno revue Oh! Yes (November 1922).
Recording: Stanley Kirkby (Winner 3264, 1918)


They All Play The Same Old Game

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1456, 1914)

 

They Can All Do As They Like With Me

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1914.

 

They Never Do That Where I Come From

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1909; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

They’re All After A Girl

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

Recording: Harry Fay (Zonophone 1381, 1914)

 

They’ve All Gone “Talkie” Mad

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Chester Goldwyn [Lareine song report in The Stage (11 July 1929, p. 5) credits Godfrey only: “a new topical song from the pen of Fred Godfrey” ] — London: Lareine, 1929.
Performed by Lewis Dennison’s Columbia Dance Band, Bournemouth (October 1929); and by Fay Steadman (October 1929).


Things Were Different Years And Years Ago

Fred Godfrey & George Formby, Jr., [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society; early version of Those Were The Days [q.v.]?


This Time Next Year

Worton David, Fred Godfrey & Hubert W. David — London: Worton David, 1925.
Sung in numerous pantomimes in December 1925, including by Clarise Chesney in Aladdin, Hippodrome Southend; by Nita Croft in Mother Goose, Royal Artillery Theatre, Woolwich, London; by Florrie Forde in Robinson Crusoe, Alhambra, Bradford; by Miss Mabs Grae in Aladdin, Borough Theatre, Stratford, London; by Daisy Taylor in Babes In The Wood, Princes, Bradford; and by Dorothy Vaughan in Red Riding Hood, Grand Opera House, Belfast.

Recordings: Stanley Kirkby (Edison Bell Winner 4458); Edison Bell Dance Orch. (Edison Bell 4385)

 

Those Were The Days

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [ca. 1939?].

 

Till You Come Back Again

Fred Godfrey — London Bert Feldman, 1926.
Sung by The Feldman Four in revue All Spice (June 1927); by Alf Sims in revue The Cannibal’s Romance, in various theatres, including the Hippodrome, Keighley (July 1927), Palace, Grimsby (August 1927), and Theatre Royal, Dewsbury (August 1927); and, according to the sheet music cover, by Dorothy Ward.

Recording: Foster Richardson (Zonophone 2961, 1927); one source suggests the song was also recorded by Randolph Sutton, but no such disc is listed in Brian Rust’s British Music Hall on Record.

 

Ting! Ting! Tra-La-La

A.J. Mills, Bennet Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1915.

Introduced by Daisy Dormer.

Sung by Miss Teddie Butt in revue The Girl Question, Palace, Bath (November 1915); by Evelyn Major in revue Thumbs Up, Hippodrome, Willesden, London (June 1916); by Ennis Parkes in Harry Day revue Look Out (1915). Interpolated in the Huddlestone & Tiller revue Did You Ever? (Winter Gardens, Blackpool, 1915)

 

Tis A Faded Picture

Fred Godfrey & Florrie Forde [some sources]; Florrie Forde advertisement says the writers are Barrett and Darewski (The Era, 18 June 1910, p. 36) — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.
Sung on stage by Frank Cass and by Florrie Forde.
Recording: Florrie Forde (Edison Amberol 12255, 1910)

 

Togo (Over In Old Japan)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

Tommy Boy!

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: [Lawrence Wright Music?], 1915.
Sung by Ethel Wilford, Pavilion, Rusholme (September 1915); and by Hetty King (April 1915).

 

Tommy’s Learning French

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
Sung by Miss Jesse Rivers, Australian vocal comedienne, Empire, Belfast (June 1915) and King’s, Dundee (June 1915); and by Dorothy Ward for recovering soldiers at the 3rd Northern General Hospital, Sheffield (May 1915) and at the Royal Hippodrome, Belfast (May 1915), in “a number that fairly brought down the house” (Northern Whig, 7 May 1915, p. 10). Also sung by Shaun Glenville to troops in France (June 1915); and by Fred Barnes..

Recordings: Will Terry (Jumbo 35939, 1915); Dorothy Ward (Regal G7219, 1915)


Tomorrow May Be “Good-bye”!

John P. Harrington, Fred Godfrey & Orlando Powell — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.

 

Tonight, By The Firelight Glow

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by Peggie Walsh & Millie Milne; and by Ventom Swift (February 1919).


Tony! Tony! Send A Marconigram

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

 

Too Many Eyes About

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1908.


Toy Town Admiral

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Paul Andrew; British Library credits Andrew alone; American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) credits Philip Sidney & Fred Godfrey — London: Lareine, 1928; Melbourne: L.F. Collin, ca. 1928; Chicago: Forster Music, 1929.


The Tripper’s Lullaby (There’s No Place Like Home)

Fred Godfrey & Maurice Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1931.
Sung by Ken Douglas in revue The Surpassing Show of 1931, Ocean, Clacton-on-Sea (July 1931); by Florrie Forde (July 1931); by Ernie Leno (July 1931); by Neville Kennard of Gordon Marsh’s Cabaret, Margate (July 1931); by Bert Murray, Pavilion, Onchan Head, Douglas, Isle of Man (August 1931); by Bond Rowell, Barrfields Pavilion, Largo, Scotland (August 1931); and by Fred Wildon's Entertainers, Pavilion, Margate (July 1931). Interpolated in revue Everything In Season, Alexandra Gardens, Weymouth (August 1931).

Recording: Florrie Forde (Imperial 2491, 1931)

 

Try A Smile (When Things Look Blue)

Fred Godfrey & Eric Valantine — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.

Sung by Maisie Ayling (October 1921); by Belle Sylvia, Empress, Brixton, London (May 1921); and by Carrie Whyte in pantomime Jack And Jill, Palace, Aberdeen (December 1921).


Turn It Around The Other Way, Timothy

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” — London: Bert Feldman, 1929.

 

’Twas An Old Fashioned Love Song

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Melbourne: Chappell, 1920.
Sung by The Balladmongers (November 1920); and by The Gresham Singers in numerous theatres (1920–21), including the Empire, Ardwick, Lancs. (February 1921). Also interpolated in several pantomimes.


’Twas An Old-Fashioned Song He Was Singing

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Wright; EMI also credits Worton David — London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

Recordings: Stanley Kirkby (Regal G6890); Lewis James (Edison Blue Amberol 3906, 1915?) [cylinder]

 

’Twas An Old, Old Song

words by Fred Godfrey, music by John Neat [Library of Congress] — London: Bert Feldman, 1907.

 

Two Little Sisters

Fred Godfrey, [1935?]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.
Song of this title sung by Charles Jones & Victor Thomas in pantomime Aladdin, Alhambra, Glasgow (January 1936).


Two Little Wooden Shoes

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

The Ugly Sisters

Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1932.
Almost certainly performed in pantomimes, where the two Ugly Sisters are stock characters.

 

The Ukulele Wedding

Fred Godfrey as “Dan Grahame” & Lawrence Wright as “Everett Lynton” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1927.

Sung by Vera Berridale in revue Froth Blowers, numerous theatres (April 1927); by Leonie O’Brien & Edna Holmes in revue Vignettes—1928, Palace, Hull (April 1928); and by Walter Williams in revue On With The Show, North Pier, Blackpool (1927).


Uncle Billy Was A Fireman

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — New York: M. Whitmark & Sons, 1911; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1938 [Library of Congress].

Recording: Venie Temple (The Winner 2232)

 

Underneath An Irish Moon

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Underneath Your Mushroom Umbrella

Fred Godfrey, Alf J. Lawrance & Harry Gifford — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.


Up Came Bonzo

words by Fred Godfrey, music by Clay Smith — Sydney: J. Albert & Son, 1925.

Introduced by Lee White in revue Let’s Go, Ambassadors Theatre, London, [1925?].

 

Up He Goes In His Little Monoplane

Fred Godfrey & George Arthurs — London: Bert Feldman, 1914 [prewar].

Recording: Ella Retford (Jumbo 1232, 1914)

 

Wait A Minute (There’s A Little Bit More To Come!)

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” & Shaun Glenville — London: Bert Feldman, 1929.

 

Wait Till I’m As Old As Father

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.

 

Wait Till The Clouds Roll By, Molly!

Fred Godfrey & George D’Albert — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.
Sung by Marie Beresford, Pavilion, Northwich (June 1909).

 

Waiting At The Garden Gate

Fred Godfrey & Max Miller, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Wake Up, John Bull!

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911; Harry Carlton also a co-author, according to Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 31 January 1911; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.


Watching The Boat Coming In (From Alabamy)

Fred Godfrey & Worton David — London: Star Music, 1914.

Sung by Revill Hall’s Entertainers, Llandudno (July 1914); by Ella Retford

“Ella Retford, who is at Holborn and Lewisham, pins her faith to Fred Godfrey and Worton David’s ‘Watching The Boat Come In’ with...gratifying results” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 7 May 1914, p. 20).

 

Way Down Home

words by Fred Godfrey, as “Eddie Stamper”, music by Lawrence Wright, as “Gene Williams” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1926.


Way Down To Honolulu

Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music; Bert Feldman, 1913.
Sung by Josie Howard (August 1914); by The Merry Japs, Morecambe (July 1914); by The Society Quartet (April 1913); by Vera & Gwen, Palais de Luxe, Whitstable (November 1913); by J.H. Wakefield, Palace, Blackpool (May 1914); and by The Waterloo Pierrots, Bridlington (July 1914)

Recording: The Elliotts (The Winner 2520, 1913)

 

We All Get A Little Bit Older Ev’ry Day

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1927.
Sung and broadcast by Miss Mabel Marks.


We All Live At No. 24

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913.

 

We All Want To Do The Same As Father

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Frank Howard, 1914.

 

We All Went Marching In

Fred Godfrey & Charles Hilbury, 1909; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 28 February 1909.

 

We Can’t All Have The Same Girl

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.

 

We Haven’t Quite Decided Yet

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Cinephone Music, 1944.

 

Wedding Day

Billy Williams, Charles Wilmott, Fred Godfrey, Tom Mellor, Vesta Tilley & John S. Baker, [date unknown]; title from EMI database. The unique collection of composing credits may suggest an error on EMI’s part, perhaps a conflating of two separate songs.


The Wedding Of Jeanie McKie (Come Along, You Heilan’ Lads)

Fred Godfrey, Tom Mellor & Billy Williams; some sources credit Harry Gifford instead of Mellor — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.


The Wedding Of The Man In The Moon

Fred Godfrey & Harry A. Steinberg — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung by Laurie Holt & Her Huzzars (January 1931). Performed in numerous pantomimes (December 1930–January 1931), including Cinderella, Grand, Derby (January 1931). Interpolated in Cyril Lawrence’s revue Paris Pie (November 1930)

 

The Wedding Of Wee MacGregor

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1930.
Sung by Harry Gordon.
Recording: Harry Gordon (Parlophone F-3013, 1930)

 

A Wedding On A Gee Gee

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright [Performing Right Society, Lawrence Wright Music trade paper advertisement]; British Library & Lawrence Wright music sheet credit Godfrey & Wright only — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
Interpolated in the Frank Ruben production Mind The Step, Islington [London] Empire (May 1915).           

 

The Wee Little House That You Live In (Is The Best Little Place Of All)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

Recordings: Herbert Payne (Zonophone Twin 1481, 1915); Glen Ellison (Edison Diamond Disc, 1915; reissued on Edison Diamond Disc 3917, early 1920s; Edison Blue Amberol 2721) [cylinder]

 

Wee MacGregor

Fred Godfrey, [1913?]

Recordings: Jack Lorimer (Regal G-6480, 1913?); (Pathé 8805, 1913); (Diamond 085, 1913)

 

Welcoming Them In To The Welcome Inn

Fred Godfrey — London: Mac Melodies; Melbourne: L.F. Collin, 1936

Recording: London Piano-Accordeon Band (Regal Zonophone MR-2184)

 

We’ll All Do The Same As The Children Do

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

 

We’ll All Go Shopping Up The West

Fred Godfrey, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 17 July 1913.

 

We’ll Have A Night Out Together Tonight

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Billy Williams — London: Star Music, 1912.

 

W.E.M.B.L.E.Y.

Ed. E. Bryant, Fred Godfrey & Hubert W. David — London: Worton David, 1924.

A song celebrating the opening of the great North London stadium. Sung by Leo H. Booker in revue Beauty Queen (June 1924); and by Ella Shields, Alhambra, London (1924).


We’re All Getting Used To It

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1253, 1913)

 

We’re All North Country Lads And Lasses

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David; some sources omit David — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

“Two of the most popular numbers with the holiday crowd were ‘There’ll Be Nothing But Boys In Khaki By The Seaside’ and ‘We’re All North Country Lads And Lasses.’ Both songs...are melodious and clever” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 27 May 1915, p. 22). Introduced by Ella Retford; sung by Nan Chester in Huddlestone & Tiller revue Did You Ever?, Winter Garden, Blackpool (1915); and by Mabel Reeve in pantomime The Babes In The Wood, Royal, Sheffield (December 1915).

Recordings: Harry Cove (Guardsman 473, 1915); Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1484, 1915); Ella Retford (Coliseum 788, 1915; Scala 663, 1915; Scala 731, 1915; Jumbo ?, 1916?); Stanley Kirkby (Regal G-6890, 1915); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2825)

 

We’re All Scotch

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman; Star Music, 1917.
Sung by Fred Barnes (1917); by Violet Miller, Beach Pavilion, Aberdeen (May 1917); by Daisy Taylor, Palace, Hull (September 1916); and by The Tiller Troupe, Royal Court, Liverpool (January 1917). Also interrpolated in numerous pantomimes (December 1916–January 1917).

 

Were All Waiting For A Girl

Fred Murray & Fred Godfrey; Stanley Mullen sheet music erroneously credits Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen; Allan’s, 1910; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 23 November 1909.


We’re In, Meredith, We’re In!

Lawrence Wright, Worton David & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Recordings: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1494, 1915); Black Diamonds Band, in “Camp Concert” (Zonophone Twin 1572, 1915)

 

Were Irish And Proud Of It, Too

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.

 

We’ve All Got To Walk Back Home

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1926.
Sung by Victoria Carmen; and by Daisy Wood.

 

We’ve Got A Lot To Be Thankful For

Fred Godfrey & Max Miller, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

We’ve Got To Put Up With It Now

Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Bert Feldman, 1916.
Interpolated in revue Rosebuds, Palace, Gloucester (January 1918)

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone Twin 1749, 1916)

 

What A Game It Is! Wow! Wow!

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1913.

A specialty for Mark Sheridan, who sang it in numerous theatres; audiences and the man in the orchestra pit with the big drum always put a hearty emphasis on the refrain’s last “Wow! Wow!” Also sung by Nan Chester, Brixton Theatre, London (January 1914); by Roland Martin in pantomime The Babes In The Wood, Grand, Glasgow (December 1913); and by Maude Mortimer in pantomime Peter Wilkins, Pavilion, Glasgow (December 1913).

Recordings: Mark Sheridan (Diamond 077, 1913; Edison Bell Winner 2473, 1913; Empire 1696; Marathon 400 or 426, 1913; Pathé 8880, 1913; Curry’s 217, 1928); Harry Fay (Zonophone Twin 1215, 1913); Bob Cannon (Cinch 5160, 1913); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo 1125, 1914)

 

What A Time We’ve Had, What A Time!

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.

Recording: Charles Collins (Zonophone Twin 1753, 1916)

 

What A Wonderful Wedding That Will Be

Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1928.
Popular song “described as the finest slow fox-trot published” (“This season’s pantomime songs,” Dundee Courier, 19 December 1928, p. 6), performed by numerous dance bands and singers, and interpolated in many pantomimes. Here is a long but only partial list:

 

Bertini’s Band, Winter Gardens, Blackpool (February 1929); Larry Brennan & His Piccadilly Revellers, Plaza, Belfast (September 1928–February 1929); The Brownie Boys, Empire, Neath (October 1928); Burton & Gurney (October 1928); Madge Carter, in pantomime Cinderella, Royal, Bristol (December 1928); pianist Miss Raie da Costa, Shepherd’s Bush Empire, London (February 1929); Tim Daniels & His Band, Bedford Theatre, London (December 1928); Herman Darewski & His Band and Gwen Rogers’ Romany Players, Covent Garden Opera House, London (December 1928); Elsie Denham & Mary Hillman in pantomime Jack O’ Hearts, Princess’s, Glasgow (December 1928); Doris & May (October 1928); Victor Duprey & His Band (October 1928); Fred Elizalde & His Band, Savoy Hotel, London, and radio broadcasts from that location (October 1928); Len Fillis & His Band (April 1929); Allan Gordon (September 1928); Greenlie & Drayton, Coliseum, London (January 1929); Jack Griver & His Junior Reveller, Queen’s Hotel, Leicester Square, London (December 1928); Jennie Hartley in pantomime Hop O’ My Thumb, Prince’s, Bristol (December 1928); Ivy Holder & Joyce Cornish in pantomime Babes In The Wood, Royal County Theatre, Bedford (December 1928); Ettie Howard (October 1928); Fred Kitchen & His Astoria Orchestra (November 1928); The Maestros (February 1929); Mason & Royal in pantomime, Gaiety, Dublin (December 1928); Teddy Morris’s Band in revue Times Have Changed, Grand, Brighton (November 1928); Joe Morrison & His Band (December 1928); Anne Murray & Lynda Martell in pantomime Cinderella, Theatre Royal, Norwich (December 1928); George Newman, Oxford Galleries, Newcastle, with a “song-scena” performed by children (February 1929); Omega Collegians Band, Empress Rooms, Kensington, London (January 1929); Denis O’Neil, radio broadcast from Cardiff (April 1928); Murray Pilcer & His Band, Ladies’ Guild Ball, Savoy Hotel, London (December 1928); Ella Retford in pantomime Humpty Dumpty, Royal Glasgow (December 1928); Chas. Roitt, Playhouse, Glasgow (February 1929); “eccentric dancer” Syd Seymour (September 1928); Hal Spooner & His Band, Alexandra, Stoke Newington (February 1929); Gwladys Stanley in pantomime Aladdin, Palace, Manchester (December 1928); Oscar Thomas, Strand Corner House, London (November 1928); The Three Mysteries (October 1928); cabaret singers and dancers Tony & Eve (February 1929); Max Wall & Myrette Morven in pantomime Robinson Crusoe, King’s, Edinburgh (December 1928); Archie Walters & His Band, Leytonstone Palais de Danse, London (November 1928); Jay Whidden & His Carlton Hotel Band, radio broadcasts (February 1929); and Pearl Wynne & Jack O’Connor in revue Miss 1928 (April 1928). Also interpolated in pantomime Cinderella, Empire, Liverpool (December 1928) — Dorothy Ward and Shaun Glenville were the stars of this show, but it is not known if they sung the song; and in pantomime The Sleeping Beauty, Grand, Leeds (January 1929).

Recordings: Hollywood Dance Orchestra (Edison Bell Winner 4873, 1929); New Mayfair Dance Orchestra (His Master’s Voice B-5601, 1929); Piccadilly Players (Columbia 5190, 1928); The Rhythmic Eight (Zonophone 5269, 1928); Hal Swain & His Café Royal Band (Regal G9238, 1928)

 

What About That Little Bit Of Love?

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1914.

 

What Did You Want To Make Me Love You For?

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by Mabel Costello.

 

What Do We Care, We Two?

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman; Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.

Introduced by Victoria Monks. Sung by Eileen Dagmar & Bebe Hutchison in pantomime The Babes In The Wood, Aldwych, London (January 1916); by Ed. E. Ford & Harry Claff in pantomime Aladdin, Grand, Clapham, London (December 1915); by Green & Craughan in the Lawrence Tiller revue All Smiles, Hippodrome, Salford (September 1915); by Elise Malpass, Empire, Hackney, London (October 1915); by Teddy Miles & Daisy May (October 1915); and by Daisy Wood, Palace, Chelsea, London (June 1915), Palace, Blackburn (July 1915), and other theatres through the rest of the year.

Recordings: Robert Carr (The Winner 2910, 1915); Walter Jefferies (HMV B-546, 1915); Stanley Kirkby (Jumbo 1294, 1915)

 

What D’yer Want To____?

Fred Godfrey — 1906; introduced by Fred Erick, title from advertisement in The Stage, 6 September 1906, p. 10. This is the earliest known Godfrey song, but many others likely were written and performed during the five years Godfrey was living and working in London after his July 1901 marriage in Wales.

 

What Ho! The Rubber Boom

Fred Godfrey, 1910.

Recording: Arthur Leslie (Columbia-Rena 1401, 1910)

 

What Is A Fellow To Do!

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1911; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 3 February 1911; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

What Shall I Do Tonight?

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript of partial lyrics in author’s collection.

 

What The-How The-Why The-Who The-Where Have You Been Tonight?

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

Recording: Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1517, 1915)

 

What Time Tomorrow Night?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 7 November 1913.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. June 1913, released on Homophone 1257, 1913; Rexophone 5627 [Australia]; and possibly on Homokord); (ca. November 1913, released on Edison Blue Amberol 23279, 1914) [cylinder]

 

What’s The Matter With The Daylight?

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 15 March 1912.

 

What’s The Use Of Playing “Home Sweet Home”

Fred Godfrey & Will E. Haines — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1907.

 

What’s Your Name, Little Girlie?

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


When A Fellow Begins To Fall In Love

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton — 1910.

Introduced by Madge Osmond; title from advertisement in The Era, 17 December 1910    

           

   

When An Irishman Goes Fighting

words by Leslie Leonard Cooke, music by Fred Godfrey; EMI also credits Shaun Glenville — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

Sung by Shaun Glenville, Finsbury Park Empire, London (September 1914).

Recording: Stanley Kirkby (Coliseum 735, 1915; Jumbo A348, 1915?)


When I Hear Those Bells Of Brittany

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1914
Sung by Victor King of The Pier Pierrots (June 1914).

 

When I See You On Sunday

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

 

When I’m Asleep

Fred Godfrey, Fred Terry, Charles Collins & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 9 June 1912

 

When I’m With You

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [1913?]..

Recording: Brett Barry (Pathé 8960, 1913?)

 

When It’s Your Best Girl

Fred Godfrey, Worton David & Lawrence Wright — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1915.
Sung by Fred Elton (April–May 1915); by Reg Wentworth, Queen’s Park Hippodrome, Manchester (September 1915) and in pantomime Cinderella, Grand Opera House, Belfast (January 1917). Interpolated in revue All Trumps, Empire, Belfast (August 1915)

Recording: The Two Filberts, Jumbo 1333, 1915)

 

When Johnny Comes Marching Home

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

When Love Peeps In At The Window

A.J. Mills, Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1919.
“There is another ballad, the refrain of which is positively ear-haunting. People cannot forget it, and in justice to its composer it must be said that nobody seems desirous of losing the attractive melody once it is mastered” (“Songs of pier and prom: Refrains we’ll all be singing at the seaside this year,” Dundee Courier, 9 June 1919, p. 8). Sung by Ina Hill, Palladium, London (October 1919); by Peggie Lawson in pantomime Little Bo Peep, Regent, Salford (December 1919); by The Melody Makers, Stratford Empire, London (October 1919); and by Elaine & Sylvia Rosslyn in pantomime Tom Thumb, Royal Princess’s Glasgow (December 1919). Interpolated in “scena” One Fleeting Hour, Palace and Hippodrome, Burnley (December 1919).

Recordings: The Unity Quartette (Columbia 2871, 1918); Hatherley Clarke-Counter (Zonophone Twin 1944, 1919), with title as When Love Creeps In The Window

 

When Mother Backed The Winner Of The Derby

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1914.

 

When She Comes Back To Me

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


When Somebody Knocks At Your Door

J.F. Lambe & Fred Godfrey — London: Reeder & Walsh, 1910.
“[A] pretty song[,]...[t]he somebody in this chorus does not mean a handsome young man but ‘someone who’s shabby and poor’” (The Era, 12 November 1910, p. 27). Sung by Miss Ray Raymond (November 1910).


When The Dear Old Temple Bells Are Ringing

Fred Godfrey & Harry Gifford — London: Frank Howard, 1914.

Presumably a knock-off of the more famous Bert Grant-Joe Young 1914 hit When The Angelus Is Ringing.


When The Factory Bell Is Ringing

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1912.

 

When The Guards Do The Birdcage Walk

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.
Introduced by Winifred Ward, Coliseum, London (August 1909).

 

When The Summer Comes Again

Fred Godfrey, [1928?]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.
A song by this title was sung by Queenie Pickford in revue Frolics, Murray’s cabaret, London (November 1928); and by Anita Creighton, also at Murray’s (January 1929).

 

When They Ask You What Your Name Is (Tell ’Em It’s Molloy)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Allan’s, 1908.

 

When We’re Made One, We Two

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1918.
Sung by Elsie Spain & Randall Jackson.

 

When You Wore A Tiny Pinafore

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

When Your Fairy Prince Comes Along

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams?, [ca. 1912]; title from Williams and Godfrey stationery.

 

When You’re Tired Of All The Others

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

When You’ve Got A Lady Near You

Fred Godfrey & Fred E. D’Albert, [1909?].

 

Where Are All The Girls?

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Shapiro; New York: Von Tilzer Music, 1908.

 

Where Are The Girls We Used To Know?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912 — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1913; title in Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 4 April 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

Recordings: Billy Williams (ca. November 1912; released on Homophon 1174, 1913; Rexophone 5013 [Australia]; reissued 1920s on Coliseum, Scala, Tower, and Homokord); Florrie Forde (Zonophone 1692, 1916) [same song?]

 

Where Did You Get The Name Of Hennessy?

Fred Godfrey & Terry Sullivan, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

Recording: Shaun Glenville (Regal G-7607, 1915)

 

Where Does Daddy Go When He Goes Out?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter; Melbourne: Allan & Co., 1912.

 

Where The Mountain Meets The Sky

Fred Godfrey & Harry Carlton — London: Bert Feldman, 1937.
Sung by Arthur Jeffreys in revue Pleasure On Parade, Villa Marina, Douglas, Isle of Man (June 1937); and by Terry Wilson. Interpolated in revue Alhambra Revels, Alhambra, Glasgow (May–June 1937).

 

Where’s The Girl You Had Last Year?

Bennett Scott, A.J. Mills & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1919.
Sung by Florrie Forde (June 1919).

 

While The Sahara Sleeps

words by Fred Godfrey, as “Eddie Stamper”, music by Lawrence Wright, as “Horatio Nicholls” — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1926.


Who Were You With Last Night?

Fred Godfrey & Mark Sheridan — London; New York: Bert Feldman; Melbourne: Stanley Mullen, 1912; American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) lists publisher as Glenwood Music; Swedish lyrics by Ernst Rolf, 1918; copyright renewed by Godfrey, 1939 [Library of Congress].


Who’s Going To Take Me For A Walk To-Night?

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1910.
Sung by Rosie Lloyd, Hippodrome, Peckham (December 1909) — “Miss Rosie Lloyd, who is always a great favourite at Peckham, sings with much archness and vivacity ‘Who’s going to take me for a walk?’, leaving the audience, like Oliver Twisy, vainly asking for more” (The Era, 1 January 1910, p. 30

 

Whos Your Friend?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1913; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Why Be Ashamed Of Him Now? (Once You Were Proud Of Your Dear Old Dad)

Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey [Billie Burford advertisement in The Era, 27 March 1909, p. 42, says Godfrey is “sole writer”] — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1909.

Sung by Miss Billie Burford in numerous theatres, including the Middlesex, London (February 1909), Empress, Brixton, London (February 1909), Grand Opera House, Harrowgate, London (February 1909), Tivoli, Manchester (March 1909), Hippodrome, Huddersfield (March 1909), Empire, Shoreditch, London (March 1909), and Grand, Halifax (April 1909).

 

Why Can’t The Girls Be Soldiers?

Fred Godfrey & John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1911.
Sung by Florrie Forde; also by Jenny Cox, Beach Pavilion, Aberdeen (May 1912); and Maisie Everette, Deby Pavilion (May 1912).

 

Why Cant We Have The Sea In London?

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1911; Swedish lyrics by Ture Nerman, 1912.


Why Did You Ever Say That You Loved Me?

[Fred?] Godfrey, 1937.

 

Why Do They Call Me Archibald?

Fred Godfrey & Alec Kendal — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, 1914.

Recording: Jack Pleasants (Zonophone Twin 1469, 1915)

 

Why Do You Think I Look So Gay?

Some sources credit Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams; other sources credit Williams & R.P. Weston, 1911.

 

Why Dont Santa Claus Bring Something To Me?

Billy Williams & Fred Godfrey, 1911.

 

The Wigan Blues

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1928.


The Wishing Well

Fred Godfrey, 1912.

Recording: Fred Earle (Zonophone Twin 922, 1912)

 

The Wishing Well

Fred Godfrey & Lawrence Barclay — 1926.

Written for Vesta Victoria‘s return to the Variety stage; sung by her at the Victoria Palace, London (March 1926).

.

 

With All Your Faults (I Love You Still)

Fred Godfrey, Harry Gifford & Lawrence Wright; Library of Congress credits words by Lawrence Wright, music by Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music; Bert Feldman, 1914.

“The new ballad, ‘With All Your Faults,’ by Fred Godfrey and Lawrence Wright, is on the high road to success, and is already placed with many leading vocalists for the summer season” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 26 February 1914, p. 30). Sung by Tom Cullen, Boscombe Hippodrome (September 1914); and by Belle Sylvia, Palace, Douglas, Isle of Man (July 1914) — “Belle Sylvia, the Lady Baritone, provides one of the principal attractions of the company at the Palace, Douglas [Isle of Man]. This week, she is delighting large audiences with two Feldman numbers, ‘When Irish Eyes Are Smiling’ and ‘With All Your Faults’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 30 July 1914, p. 17).

Recording: Lionel Rothery as “Dan Walker” (Jumbo 1308, 1915)

 

The Wonder Of Your Eyes

words by Worton David, music by Fred Godfrey, as “Godfrey Williams” [?] — London: Worton David, 1924.
Sung by Jean Allistone in Fred Karno’s revue The Love Match (December 1924); by Clarice Clare (January 1926); by Leslie Gould (September 1925); and by Cyril Kynaston in cabaret Nesting Time, Queen’s, London (July 1927)

 

Wonder Where Is Mary?

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

Wonder Where You’ve Been (Little Nellie Dean)

Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1931.
Sung by Bob & Alf Pearson, Pavilion, Perth (July–September 1931), Lido, Islington, London (December 1931), Empire, Sunderland (December 1931); and by Vine & Russell (October 1931).

Recording: Stanley Kirkby (Edison Bell Radio 1543)

 

Won’t There Ever Be Any Wedding Bells For Me?

John P. Harrington & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.
“A song that bids fair to be in everybody’s mouth in the near future is Feldman’s recent acquisition ‘Won’t there be any wedding bells for me?’....The chorus is simple, but distinctly original and arresting, while the tune is melodious. The theme is a love-story, and concerns the doings of a love-sick youth, anxious to wed his pretendedly-reluctant fiancée, who at last consents to marry him, merely, as she herself says, to save him reiterating the interrogation of the title” (“Songs, Writers, and Singers,” The Era, 26 February 1910, p. 24).

Sung by unnamed performer, Hippodrome, Peckham, London (March 1910); by Kitty Kennedy-Allen, Olympia Gardens, Rhyl (June 1910); and by Gordon Stretton, Queen’s, Poplar, London (February 1910).

Recordings: Harry Fay (The Twin 282, 1910); as “Fred Vernon” (Columbia-Rena 1359, 1910)

 

The World Turned Upside Down [possibly also called If the World Was Turned Upside Down]

Fred Godfrey, 1913.
Sung by Mark Sheridan, Palace, Southampton (January 1913)

Recording: Mark Sheridan (Columbia-Rena 2110, 1913)

 

A Worm Like You

Fred Godfrey, [1939?]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.
A song by this title was sung by Jones & Thomas in pantomime Cinderella, New Theatre, Cardiff (January 1940).

 

The Worst Of It Is, I Like It

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1913.

 

Would Anybody Like A Little Fairy?

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; manuscript of lyrics in author’s collection.

 

Would I Like To See My Old Hometown?

Harry Castling, Charles Collins & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1921.
Sung by Victoria Carmen.

 

Years And Years Ago

Fred Godfrey, [1942?]; title from EMI database.
A song by this title was sung by Ursula Doyle in pantomime Red Riding Hood, Royal, Dublin (December 1942).


Yes I Do

Lawrence Wright as “Gene Williams” & Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.


The Yiddisher Irish Baby (Levi, Carney, Jacob, Barney, Michael Isaacstein)

Fred Godfrey, Lawrence Wright & Worton David — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1914; London: Bert Feldman, 1915.

Sung on stage by both Ella Retford and Shaun Glenville, “who makes the most of the delightfully tricky chorus” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 15 April 1915, p. 9). “At a concert given to the wounded soldiers at the patriotic Hospital, Wandsworth [London],on Saturday, August 14, the bulk of the music was from Feldman’s catalogue. The soldiers ‘chorused’ every item, but their special favourite was the song with the tongue-twisting chorus, ‘The Yiddisher Irish Baby’” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 19 August 1915, p. 22). Also sung by Reg Bolton, of Reg Bolton’s Fashion Plates, Rusholme Pavilion (September 1915); by George Delamare of Ellison’s Entertainers, Aberystwyth, Wales (July 1915); by Nora Delaney, Victoria Palace, London (October 1915); by Vincent Emley in revue It’s Warm! (June 1915); by Ethel Mayne, Summer Gardens Pavilion, Barry Dock, Wales (July 1915).

Recordings: Shaun Glenville (Regal G-7221, 1915); Stanley Kirkby as “Frank Miller” (The Winner 2825); Will Terry (Jumbo 35940, 1915?)

 

Yolanda

Fred Godfrey & Harry Castling, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

You Can Always Have A Bit Of Sunshine

Fred Godfrey & Max Miller, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.


You Can Never Tell

Harry Carlton & Fred Godfrey — London: Francis, Day & Hunter, [ca. 1911].

Recording: Florrie Forde (Amberol 12368, 1911)

 

You Can’t Fool Around With The Women

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.

Sung by male impersonator Hetty King, Kilburn Empire and Camberwell Palace, London (April 1920) — “Hetty King, who heads the bill at the Camberwell Palace [London] this week, introduced on Monday night a new song from the pens of Fred Godfrey and Bennett Scott called ‘You Can’t Fool Around With The Women’. Its reception was most gratifying, and it promises to be one of Miss King’s biggest successes” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 22 April 1920, p. 22). Also sung by Fred Archer, Pavilion, Burntisland, Scotland (August 1920); by Fred Barnes; by Etkins, Fay & Etkins, Hippodrome, Brighton (May 1920); by Feldman’s Songsters, Douglas, Isle of Man (June 1920); by Violet Trevenyon, Islington Empire, London (November 1921); and by Reg Wentworth, South London Theatre, Walthamstow Palace, and East Ham Palace (August 1920)

 

You Can’t Love Two Girls At The Same Time

George Formby, Jr. & Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, 1942.

Recording: George Formby, Jr. (Regal Zonophone MR-3663, 1942); reissued on 5-CD set “George Formby, The War And Postwar Years, Volume 2 of the JSP Compilation” (JSP CD-1902, 2006)

 

You Gave Me A Rosary

Fred Godfrey, A.J. Mills & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1916.

 

You Get More Like Your Mother Every Day

A.J. Mills, Worton David & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1915.

Sung by Marie Blyth, Camberwell Empire (June 1915) — “Miss Blyth anticipates that ‘You Grow [sic] More Like Your Mother Every Day’, a ballad that has proved successful wherever sung in the provinces, will prove equally acceptable in London” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 3 June 1915, p. 16); by Ida Re Nita, Hippodrome, Mexborough, Yorkshire (June 1915) — “[L]ast week Ida Re Nita sang ‘You Grow [sic] More Like Your Mother Every Day’ for the first time, and so successful was the number that Miss Re Nita has decided to retain it in her repertory. During the week she was the recipient of of many congratulations for her clever rendering of this ballad” (“Song Notes,” The Stage, 3 June 1915, p. 16).

 

You Go Where Hugo Goes

Fred Godfrey & J.F. Lambe, 1910.
Sung by Leonard Barry — “Mr. Leonard Barry, who we know as a character comedian with the rare faculty of being funny in French as well as English, has just now a song that is bound to have a great vogue. ‘You Go Where Hugo Goes’ will, if we mistake not, be one of the hits of the year, and it will attain that position by reason of its cleverly-worded chorus. It is not exactly a tongue-twister, though in chortling the refrain it would be easy to trip. But there is no such thing as ‘halting’ with the gods at the Met. [Metropolitan Theatre, London], who give it a rousing interpretation, being helped by the tracing of the words on the Bioscope sheet” (“London Variety Theatres,” The Era, 19 February 1910, p. 21).

 

You Must Have Been An Angel Sometime

Fred Godfrey, [date unknown]; title from EMI database.

 

You Shall Have A Shalimar (Indian Garden)

Harry Castling & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1907.
“For a charming Indian romance Fred Godfrey and Harry Castling are responsible. They have placed it with the Star Music Company, and it is said to have a delightfully quaint and catchy melody” (“Songs, Writers, and Singers,” The Era, 16 February 1907, p. 22).

 

You Were The First One To Teach Me To Love

Fred Godfrey, Ronald F. Wakley & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music; Melbourne: Dinsdales’, 1915.

 

You Would, You Know You Would

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.

 

You Wouldn’t Know The Old Home Now

Fred Godfrey — London: Lawrence Wright Music, [date unknown].

 

Your Father And Mother Are Irish

Will Letters & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1910.

 

Your Number’s Up

Fred Godfrey & Kenneth Lyle — London: Shapiro, Von Tilzer Music, 1907.
Sung by Little Cliff (October 1907); and by Esta Stella (October 1907).

 

Your Smiles Are The Sunshine (Your Tears Are The Rain)

Tom Mellor, Harry Gifford & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914.


Your Wonderful Eyes

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Star Music, 1920.
Sung by Isa Wise.

 

You’re A Friend Of Mine — I’m A Friend of Yours

Worton David & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1914. 


You’re A Naughty Boy (She’s A Naughty Girl As Well)

Fred Godfrey as “Edward E. Elton” & J. Lloyd as “James Walsh”, 1929.

 

You’re Some Tram-Conductor Girl

Tom Mellor & Fred Godfrey — London: Bert Feldman, 1916.
Sung by Lily Hartley, Empire, Islington, London (July 1916).


You’re Sure To Find A ——— [Sailor, Policeman, etc.] There

Fred Godfrey & Billy Williams, 1912; title in Godfrey letters assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 5 June 1912 and 24 June 1912; manuscript of music and lyrics in author’s collection.

 

You’re Sure To Find A Scotchman There

Fred Godfrey, 1913.

Recording: Jack Lorimer (Columbia-Rena 2251, 1913; Pathé 8804, 1913)

 

You’re The Apple Of My Eye

Fred Godfrey & John Neat — London: Bert Feldman, 1909.


Youre The One

Fred Godfrey, Fred J. Barnes & Billy Williams, 1911; title is in a Godfrey letter assigning rights to Billy Williams dated 20 July 1911.

 

You’’ve Got Me And I’’ve Got You

Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1914.

 

You’ve Got Nothing On Me

Fred Godfrey & Leslie Sarony, [date unknown]; exists in manuscript form only, according to the Performing Right Society.

 

You’ve Got To Go To Bed

A.J. Mills, Bennett Scott & Fred Godfrey — London: Star Music, 1916.

 

You’ve Got To Show Me

Fred Godfrey & Bennett Scott — London: Bert Feldman, 1920.
Sung by Caprice Proud (April 1921); and by Esta Stella.

 

 

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